Results 1 to 10 of 10

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 229
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    inappropriate phrase

    Let me take "reduce" as an example.

    reduce: to make something smaller or less in size, amount, or price(I seem to hear people saying, "I don't need you to tell me what "reduce" means" :wink: ).

    We may say, "reduce crime, costs, workforce...". It seems that we can "recude" anything. My question is, does "reduce" work well with anything? Could you give me an example where you would not use "reduce" ? (Like, I would not say "reduce (a noun) ". Thanks. :)


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 1,369
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2
    Don't reduce your kids, that was a baaad movie.

    FRC


    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 229
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Don't reduce your kids, that was a baaad movie.

    FRC
    reduce...kids? This is an incorrect usage, right?


    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 229
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4
    Cas, tdol, what do you think? :)


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 1,369
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5
    American production at its best ;)

    FRC

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 44,225
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6
    There are some cases where there is a better word- you might shorten trousers that were too long, but you wouldn't reduce them.


    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 229
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    There are some cases where there is a better word- you might shorten trousers that were too long, but you wouldn't reduce them.
    Would you say something like "reduce one's courage"?
    :)

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    There are some cases where there is a better word- you might shorten trousers that were too long, but you wouldn't reduce them.
    Would you say something like "reduce one's courage"?
    :)
    I believe not. courage is not quantifiable (i.e., the property of a thing that is measurable). :wink:

    Reduce your stress (level)
    => Levels are quantifiable

    Reduce your food intake
    => intakes are quantifiable

    Reduce the number of children
    =>Numbers are quantifiable

    Reduce your speech (i.e., the number of words in your speech/pubic address)

    As for nouns that don't go with 'reduce', try words that are not associated with things that are quantifiable e.g., Reduce your dog

    I'm having my toes reduced? (OK) It means, I'm getting them shortened.

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 229
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    There are some cases where there is a better word- you might shorten trousers that were too long, but you wouldn't reduce them.
    Would you say something like "reduce one's courage"?
    :)
    I believe not. courage is not quantifiable (i.e., the property of a thing that is measurable). :wink:

    Reduce your stress (level)
    => Levels are quantifiable

    Reduce your food intake
    => intakes are quantifiable

    Reduce the number of children
    =>Numbers are quantifiable

    Reduce your speech (i.e., the number of words in your speech/pubic address)

    As for nouns that don't go with 'reduce', try words that are not associated with things that are quantifiable e.g., Reduce your dog

    I'm having my toes reduced? (OK) It means, I'm getting them shortened.

    All the best, :D
    :D Thanks to your explanation, I believe I am pretty clear now.

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    :D Thanks to your explanation, I believe I am pretty clear now.
    You're welcome. :D

    Try,

    ..., it's pretty/fairly clear now.

    All the best, :D

Similar Threads

  1. GOING TO, ETC
    By jwschang in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: 29-Dec-2003, 18:15
  2. Prepositional-Participal-Gerund-Infinitive Phrases
    By raelynn in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2003, 20:33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •