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Thread: GRAMMAR

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    #21

    Re: GRAMMAR

    Quote Originally Posted by Lib
    One of these day / months I'll work out how this 'quote' thing works ... or then again maybe I won't.
    Tdol .. it's not really fair to say that you'd hear 'tree' in Ireland. In fact it's the same as saying that the British say 'free'.
    If you want help formatting your messages, simply look here for a tutorial: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/faq.php?mode=bbcode

    I'm not a teacher, so please consider any advice I give in that context.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #22

    Re: GRAMMAR

    Quote Originally Posted by Lib
    One of these day / months I'll work out how this 'quote' thing works ... or then again maybe I won't.
    Click on Reply and the material in the posting you are replying to is automatically quoted. (The same thing happens when you click on Quote except the this message thing isn't there.) To quote selected segments of a posting simply put "quote" (in brackets) at one end and "/quote" (also in brackets) at the other end. You would not, of course, use quote marks. (Brackets: [ ] )

    8)

  2. svivekanandarajah
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    #23

    Re: GRAMMAR

    I'VE HEARD THAT FIRTEEN FOR THIRTEEN IN LONDON.

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    #24

    Re: GRAMMAR

    Quote Originally Posted by svivekanandarajah
    I'VE HEARD THAT FIRTEEN FOR THIRTEEN IN LONDON.
    Welcome to the forum! :D

    BTW, I agree with number 3 on your list, but it seems like something is lost in the translation. More to the point, doesn't that mean that you shouldn't eat food that will make you pass gas? :wink:

    8)

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    #25
    I think it refers to the stench junk food gives off, especially if you're sitting next to someone on public transport. I've seen it used as an advert on the underground here, using the love is... cartoon, against burgers, etc.

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    #26

    Re: GRAMMAR

    That is clearly not what I was thinking it was at first. I don't know how I could have been so mistaken.

    Does "holdup" have the same double meaning over there that it does over here. The "Don't holdup the train" is something I find rather interesting. :wink:

    8)

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    #27

    Re: GRAMMAR

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Does "holdup" have the same double meaning over there that it does over here. The "Don't holdup the train" is something I find rather interesting. :wink: 8)
    So does ole learner here. Thought of Superman at first; then of Ronald Biggs (who remembers him? He lived in Brazil for a time.)

    m

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    #28

    Re: GRAMMAR

    Quote Originally Posted by Márcio Osório
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Does "holdup" have the same double meaning over there that it does over here. The "Don't holdup the train" is something I find rather interesting. :wink: 8)
    So does ole learner here. Thought of Superman at first; then of Ronald Biggs (who remembers him? He lived in Brazil for a time.)
    In this country (USA) a holdup is a robbery. (Example: "The James gang held up trains.") Thus, "Don't holdup the train presents an interesting word picture for me. It's almost like they are saying, "Please don't rob us." :wink:

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    #29

    Re: GRAMMAR

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    In this country (USA) a holdup is a robbery. (Example: "The James gang held up trains.") Thus, "Don't holdup the train presents an interesting word picture for me. It's almost like they are saying, "Please don't rob us." :wink:
    Yes, it is. And I'm sorry for jumping to (and then tripping over my own) conclusions. Not until I checked the dictionary did I know that hold up actually was being used in the sense of "Don't stop, delay, or impede the course or advance of" the train, in that case at least.

    "Superman", that old yet very well known DC comics character, could have easily held one up as well; British Ronald Biggs, a train robber of the 60s, had actually, well, held up another. And most likely the traffic that the robbery generated at that time.

    Please tell me if I'm being dense, in which case you'd promptly let me know anyway. And if I'm using the correct tenses. <double winks&g>

    Thanks again.

    m

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    #30

    Re: GRAMMAR

    You are right, of course, about the other meaning of "hold up". I imagine that the railroad authorities wouldn't want any holdups of any kind.

    Quote Originally Posted by Márcio Osório
    Please tell me if I'm being dense, in which case you'd promptly let me know anyway.
    If that ever happened it would be the first time (both you being dense and me telling you).

    :wink:

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