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Thread: worry

  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
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    worry

    Hello,


    What is the most common preposition used after "to worry", do we say "to worry about something or to worry with something"? When I look it up in Google, I find both, so I 'm a bit confused .


    Thanks
    W

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Re: worry

    We worry about something and are worried by something.

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    banderas is offline Key Member
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    Re: worry

    Quote Originally Posted by Will17 View Post
    Hello,


    What is the most common preposition used after "to worry", do we say "to worry about something or to worry with something"? When I look it up in Google, I find both, so I 'm a bit confused .


    Thanks
    W
    We say "worry about"
    "worry for" which means "worry on behalf of someone"
    "worry at" which means to "to keep trying to find a way of solving a problem"
    We may say "what is the worry with this window? which means "what bis the problem with..." but I am not sure about the last one so if native speakers confirm it, feel free to use it.

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    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Re: worry

    Attention: I'm not a teacher.

    Hi Will17,

    I know worry about and worry over but there is once in a blue moon (once in a while) usage of worry with.

    I suppose the latter usage is a throwback (see below the meaning of worien).

    Worrying may shorten one's life, but not as quickly as it once did. The ancestor of our word, Old English wyrgan, meant “to strangle.” Its Middle English descendant, worien, kept this sense and developed the new sense “to grasp by the throat with the teeth and lacerate” or “to kill or injure by biting and shaking.” This is the way wolves or dogs might attack sheep, for example. In the 16th century worry began to be used in the sense “to harass, as by rough treatment or attack,” or “to assault verbally,” and in the 17th century the word took on the sense “to bother, distress, or persecute.” It was a small step from this sense to the main modern senses “to cause to feel anxious or distressed” and “to feel troubled or uneasy,”

    There are a few examples from BNC:

    ,who had the job of co-ordinating financial assistance to industry in the regions, to worry with him.
    It's a real worry with him being so far away.
    I don't think we need to worry with him to defend us.

    Several good references are listed in the further reading, but you need not worry about them now.
    You don't have to worry about which way to go, or whether to go at all…
    Power Not that our world leaders have much to worry about .
    I can reassure you that your sexy dreams are nothing to worry about .
    And what's more Monika need not worry about her future.
    I still need to know more and it is something I think we all worry about .
    What you need, sunshine, is more homework if you've time to worry about silly things like that.
    He is their danger man --; he is the one we must worry about most.
    But there is nothing to worry about now.
    I told her not to worry about it.
    Don't worry about Vitamin C.
    But does that mean you don't need to worry about the risks of eating beef?
    At least I don't have to worry about the bailiffs because there is nothing left to take.
    I just had to stay calm and not worry about winning.

    While policy is in the formative stages there is a constant worry over how a particular initiative, or response to a crisis, will appear in…
    Royal College of Nursing members at the hospital had expressed worry over possible job losses and morale was said to be at a low ebb.
    It's been a great worry over the last few weeks.
    You must put it down to jet lag and worry over my sister;
    In fact, Faye hadn't had much worry over the cocktail party, as Mrs Porter had prepared everything and all had done.
    And you're not to worry over your own case.
    Well, that's not for you to worry over .

    Regards.

    V.

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