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    #1

    Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to interpret the following sentence:

    Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.

    I know a few meaning of the verb interfere such as:

    • To be or create a hindrance or obstacle.
    • To perform an act of interference.
    • To intervene or intrude in the affairs of others; meddle.
    • To cause interference.
    For all that I got in a difficult position by translating the above sentence into my natural language. Will you help me to turn the corner?

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.

    If you try to do something that you are not able to do [drive a car, for instance], it will interfere - prevent - you from doing what you can do [walk to the shops]

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your distinct interpretation of the sentence in question.

    Unfortunately I am none the wiser for it. The part the preposition “with” played remains obscure. As I mentioned above in my previous post the verb “to intervene” may mean “to be or create a hindrance or obstacle” and “to intervene or intrude in the affairs of others; meddle”. When used in the meaning of “to be or create a hindrance or obstacle” , the verb is followed by the preposition “with”. e.g.

    There is something interfering with the telephone connection. I can’t hear you.

    When used in the meaning “to intervene or intrude in the affairs of others; meddle” , it is followed by the preposition “in”, e.g.

    If he had not interfered in the argument, his friends might have had a serious quarrel.

    Would you tell me some more about the above-mentioned?

    Regards.

    V.

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