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Thread: Apostrophe


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    Apostrophe

    "I have fixed my co-wokers, families, and friends' car." <--correct? why?

    "I have fixed my co-wokers', families', and friends' car." <--incorrect? why?

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    #2
    "I have fixed my co-workers', families', and friends' car."

    This is correct as long as you have more than one of each. More likely,would be the following:
    "I have fixed my co-workers', family's, and friends' car."

    We generally only have one family.

    PS note the spelling of 'workers'


    • Join Date: Jul 2003
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    #3
    how come it is not cars?
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #4
    "There goes the days pay." <--incorrect?
    "There goes the day pay." <--incorrect?
    "There goes the day's pay." <--correct? Does this mean that "day" belongs to "pay"? And does the sentence mean that your pay for today is gone?


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #5
    There goes the payday?

    FRC


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    There goes the payday?

    FRC
    I am trying to say there goes your pay for today.

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    #7
    There goes your day's pay.


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    #8
    The gravy guns’ positions are changed. <-correct? what does this mean?
    The gravy gun’s positions are changed. <-correct? what does this mean?

    The gravy gun’s position is changed. <-correct? what does this mean?
    The gravy guns’ position is changed. <-correct? what does this mean?

    Is it correct to say?
    This is a Windows XP’s service pack. <--this sentence sounds kind of awkward to me, can someone explain to me why?
    Or this would be better? If so, why?
    This is a Windows XP service pack.

    These are Jack’s assets. <--does this mean these assets belong to one Jack?
    These are Jacks’ assets. <--does this mean these assets belong to many Jacks?

    These are science books.
    These are science’s books. <---this sounds peculiar? Why and is it incorrect?

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by bmo
    how come it is not cars?
    Thanks.
    I have fixed my friend's car. (one friend, one car)
    I have fixed my friends' car. (more than one friend, one car)
    I have fixed my friends' cars. (more than one friend, more than one car)

    I have fixed my coworker's, family's, and friend's car. (one car each)
    I have fixed my coworker's, family's, and friend's cars. (more than one car each or one car each (i.e., I have fixed each of their cars)

    All the best, :D

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #10
    The gravy guns’ positions are changed. (OK)
    The gravy gun’s positions are changed. (Not OK)
    ==>gun's position (one gun, one position, is)

    The gravy gun’s position is changed. (has been changed)
    The gravy guns’ position is changed. (have been changed)

    This is a Windows XP's service pack. (Not OK)
    ==> This is Windows XP's service pack.
    ==> This service pack belongs to Windows XP.

    This is a Windows XP service pack. (OK)

    These are Jack’s assets. (Jack owns them; they are his)
    These are Jacks’ assets. (More than one Jack; sounds Odd, though)

    Jacks, pronunication: [jaeks], means, "Jack's".

    These are science books. (OK; adjective)
    These are science’s books. (Not OK; 'science' is inanimate; animate noun take apostrophe -'s; inanimate nouns usually take the 'of' phrase:

    1a. John's book
    (John is animate; he can own/possess things)

    1b. book of John's (Not OK)

    2a. leg of the table (table is inanimate; the leg is a part of the table; the table doesn't own/possess the leg). :wink:

    2b. table's leg (OK, but means the table owns/possesses the leg)

    All the best, :D

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