Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 52

Thread: Apostrophe

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I love you! :D

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,370
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Eh, at least you know I read your posts!

    FRC

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Why do you think 3. is OK and the rest Not OK?
    Thanks.
    A person only has one body. I'm just making sure, incase there are any exceptions.

    What do these mean?
    1. I am just making sure, incase there is any exception.
    2. I am just making sure, incase there are any exceptions.
    I don't get it? Do they mean the same? Which one do I use? Does it matter?

    3. Throughout the 90's... (What does the apostrophe mean? Does it mean it ommited '1990s'?)

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Eh, at least you know I read your posts!

    FRC

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    1. I am just making sure, in case there is any (one particular) exception to the rule/example/case/ and so on. (Singular exception, One exception)

    2. I am just making sure, in case there are any exceptions (at all) to the rule/examaple/case and so on. (Plural exceptions, One or More exceptions)

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    3. Throughout the 90's...
    (What does the apostrophe mean? Does it mean it ommited '1990s'?)
    The apostrophe is used incorrectly. It should read:

    3. Throughout the '90s...

    The apostrophe before '90 represents the missing numbers 19 (i.e., throughout the 1990s...). The final -s on 90s expresses plural number (i.e., all the years from 1990 all the way up to 1999.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Style Guide
    Use an "s" without an apostrophe after the year to indicate spans of decades or centuries, a plural. Use an apostrophe before the year for class years or abbreviations to indicate the "20" is omitted. Any reference to the decades or classes from the 1900s needs to use the "19."

    Right: The university was formed in the 1960s.
    Right: She belonged to the Class of 1924.
    Right: Shannon will graduate with the Class of '03.
    Wrong: The '60s were famous for hippies, flower power and the peace movement.
    Right: Blair Underwood, A1988, was the guest speaker at commencement 2000.
    Wrong: Blair Underwood, A'88, spoke to the graduating class of 2000.

    An apostrophe after the year is needed for possessives.

    Right: The presidential election was 1980's biggest news story.

    Source: Click Here.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The '60s were famous for hippies, flower power and the peace movement.
    What is wrong with the one above?

    Do not use the word "on" before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion.

    Right: The meeting will be held Monday.
    Right: He will be inaugurated Feb. 22.
    Right: The program ends in December
    1. The meeting will be held on Monday. (Why 'on' isn't there?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    The '60s were famous for hippies, flower power and the peace movement.
    What is wrong with the one above?
    Actually, it's OK, but according to the source, '60s should be written out as 1960s because it refers to the last decade. We are no longer in the 1900s; we're in the 2000s. :wink: So, '60s for 2060 is OK, but '60s for 1960s is not OK, according to the source:

    Use an apostrophe before the year for class years or abbreviations to indicate the "20" is omitted. Any reference to the decades or classes from the 1900s needs to use the "19."
    Apparently, the apostrophe represents 20, not 19. It's odd, I agree, but it's what's recommended.

    Do not use the word "on" before a date or day of the week when its absence would not lead to confusion.

    Right: The meeting will be held Monday.
    Right: He will be inaugurated Feb. 22.
    Right: The program ends in December
    1. The meeting will be held on Monday. (Why 'on' isn't there?[/quote]

    It means, if 'on' is redundant, then you can omit it e.g., The meeting will be held (on) Monday. You can either add 'on' or leave 'on' out). Since 'on' usually goes with dates and days, leaving it out is OK because the reader/listener knows it's there.

    All the best, :D

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks.

    Are these correct? If not, why? What do they mean?
    1. People's mind.
    2. Peoples' mind.
    3. People's minds.
    4. Peoples' minds.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    12,971
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    People is plural so don't add -s before the apostrophe:

    1. People's mind. :D
    2. Peoples' mind. :(
    3. People's minds. :D
    4. Peoples' minds. :(

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What does #1 and #2 mean?
    1. People's mind.
    2. People's minds.

    Are these correct?
    3. I joined the computer geeks gang. (Describing what kind of gang?)
    4. I joined the computer geeks’ gang. (computer geeks belong to 'gang'?)

    ('Computer Geek' as in the name of the gang)
    5. I joined the Computer Geeks gang. (Is this correct?)
    6. I joined the Computer Geeks' gang. (Correct?)

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. genetives (apostrophe)
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Sep-2004, 20:48
  2. Use of apostrophe
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2004, 18:52
  3. Use of apostrophe
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2004, 18:51
  4. Putting the apostrophe inthe right place
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Feb-2004, 22:42
  5. apostrophe
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2004, 20:59

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •