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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default effective learning

    hi teacher,

    my name is toru ichima from chiba, japan.
    is there any why to learning more effective english?
    what's the tip for able write properly english?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Hi, Toru, the basic way to improve is through practice, but I have contacted one of our Japanese posters who writes perfect English and asked him to make some suggestions.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: effective learning

    Quote Originally Posted by toru
    hi teacher,

    my name is toru ichima from chiba, japan.
    is there any why to learning more effective english?
    what's the tip for able write properly english?

    thanks
    If you want to write properly English, it will be the best, when you read many books and news in English. If you also want to improve your speaking, than you should look TV. I also look CNN every afternoon for ca. one hour.

    I hope that I could help you a little bit.

    Kind regards,
    Dany

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Hi, Toru, the basic way to improve is through practice, but I have contacted one of our Japanese posters who writes perfect English and asked him to make some suggestions.
    Hello, toru!

    I'm honored to be called on, but I'm not sure I deserve the compliment "a Japanese poster who writes perfect English."

    Well, I think almost everything is well explained by tdol and Dany. But I would like to add one more thing: have your writing checked by a native speaker of English for proper spelling, grammar, and punctuation, whenever it's possible.

    It's like playing an instrument, or a sport...whatever; if you want to be good at it, you have to learn it from someone who really knows how to play it. :wink:

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Plus, and before that, think in English, not in your frist language, Japanese, when you write something in English. Thinking in Japanese first and trying to make a direct word-for-word translation is a bad thing that most Japanese learners would do, IMO. Avoid it, OK?

    Good luck! :wink:

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    It's like playing an instrument, or a sport...whatever; if you want to be good at it, you have to learn it from someone who really knows how to play it.
    My former teachers in elementary school were not mathematicians, but they taught me some maths though. Even non-experts can know something you don't, and help you on specific points. The thing is, how do you find out if you can trust them? This is all the more difficult as people are quick to believe they are, or make themselves out to be, an expert. This is a fairly general question, not exclusively pertaining to learning languages. Hopefully reality catches up with people pretty quickly, and eventually either they realize what their actual level is, or they find a smaller pond. But the "get ouf of my way, non-native" attitude (not that I'm saying it's yours) is IMO not the best. Making the extra effort of considering non-expert opinions gives yourself more opportunities to improve, if only by explaining why they're inadequate. A teacher may drop by afterwards, and point out that your explanation is not altogether right, and suddenly, everybody has learned something! And of course the non-expert might be right in the first place, which then turns the question into an ego problem (How darst thou correct me, thou fool?).
    Just my opinion ;)

    FRC

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Francois, I'm not saying "get ouf of my way, non-native" (Actually, I'm a Japanese teaching English here in Japan, you know. :) ). Read carefully. I said "whenever it's possible."

    Even though I've been involved in Englsih education for 8 years or so, sometimes I get confused thinking about whether this expression sounds natural and that expression doesn't. I think the thing that non-natives can hardly do is to tell the natural from the unnatural. So, I think we should ask native speakers about our English whenever it is possible.

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Mind you, non-native speakers can develop an ear for that, but that depends on location, contact, etc.

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    Francois, I'm not saying "get ouf of my way, non-native" (Actually, I'm a Japanese teaching English here in Japan, you know. Smile ). Read carefully. I said "whenever it's possible."
    Read carefully too, I said "not that I'm saying it's yours". Don't take it personally, it is a general comment toward the "never trust non-natives" way of thinking.
    I think the thing that non-natives can hardly do is to tell the natural from the unnatural.
    Yes, but in many instances it's possible to acquire a knowledge of what is said and what is not in specific situations. This is basically the way the natives learned the language in their childhood. Of course, the non-native can make such a distinction in a limited set of presumably simple situations, but it's still something.

    FRC

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    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Read carefully too, I said "not that I'm saying it's yours". Don't take it personally, it is a general comment toward the "never trust non-natives" way of thinking.
    When I read your comments, honestly I thought the phrase "not that I'm saying it's yours" was some sort of safe-guard. The entire context seemed to me to indicate that you interpreted my messages as some kind of anti-non-natives, which is absolutely wrong.

    Well, never mind.


    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Yes, but in many instances it's possible to acquire a knowledge of what is said and what is not in specific situations. This is basically the way the natives learned the language in their childhood. Of course, the non-native can make such a distinction in a limited set of presumably simple situations, but it's still something.
    Let me tell you that I take it for granted that toru has had the formal eduaction here in Japan, which means he has learned English from Japanese teachers of English for a while. I don't think he is studying English all by himsellf. Plus, Dany gave him his practical advice before I gave mine. So my "go-for-the-natives-if-possible" is additional, complementary advice, so to speak.

    Remember the title of this post. It's "effective learning", not "the basics of learning." :wink:

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