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Thread: travel or trip?

  1. #1
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    Default travel or trip?

    "When is your next travel?" or "When is your next trip?"

    I received 2 answers saying that trip is the more appropriate word to use in this sentence. Unfortunately, I didn't receive any explanations why. Could someone help me please?

    When is it right to use the word travel and the word trip? And can't I use the words interchangeably?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: travel or trip?

    Do not use "travel" as a singular noun like that.

    Your travels may take you around the world, but you go on a trip.

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    Default Re: travel or trip?

    Thanks Barb_D. Now that you mentioned that, may I ask if it's correct to say: "Let's talk about travel".

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    Smile Re: travel or trip?

    Quote Originally Posted by drifter View Post
    Thanks Barb_D. Now that you mentioned that, may I ask if it's correct to say: "Let's talk about travel".
    Absolutely. "Let's talk about travel" is a comment which frequently results in long and interesting discussions about where people have visited.

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    Default Re: travel or trip?

    ...except that phrasing it so suggests introducing the lesson plan of a primary school teacher to her class.
    Most native speakers would introduce the topic with:
    "Do you like to travel?"

  6. #6
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    Smile Re: travel or trip?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    ...except that phrasing it so suggests introducing the lesson plan of a primary school teacher to her class.
    Most native speakers would introduce the topic with:
    "Do you like to travel?"

    I would say that the context of the usage has a lot to do with it. Consider people who are chatting over dinner. Having exhausted a previous subject, and sitting in silence, someone says "Let's talk about travel" as a way to get the conversation started again.

    Or, in the case of two people who haven't chatted in a while, one might ask "What shall we talk about?" with the other replying "Let's talk about travel."

    There is no indication that the originally posted query was intended to be a question -- such as, "Do you like to travel?"

    The query asked if the phrase was correct, and acceptable. It is.

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