Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: subject to

  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default subject to

    Dear teachers,

    There are two fundamental direction for use of the expression subject to in English language.

    On the one hand subject to disposed behind he verb “to be” conveys some restriction and limitation.

    I know at least four different meanings of the expresion subject to namely: be under the control or authority of, be prone or disposed to, be likely to incur or receive, and depend on, be likely to be affected by.

    There are a few examples:

    All citizens in this nation are subject to the law.
    This child has always been subject to colds.
    This memo is subject to misinterpretation.
    Our vacation plans are subject to the boss's whims.

    To be subject to the laws of nature.
    I am subject to anger.
    To be subject to temptation.
    The plan is subject to modification.
    A treaty is subject to ratification.
    The price is subject to a discount of 5%.
    The prices in this catalogue are subject to revision.
    To be subject to call.
    To be subejct to market fluctuations.
    This offer is subject to the goods being unsold (or beeing free) on receipt of your reply.
    This offer is subject to prior sale. (US)

    On the other hand, if subject to is disposed not after the verb “to be” but after another word the expression in question changed its meaning with a broad hint of conventionallity.

    Would you be kind enough to verify the following sentences?

    We offer you, subject to your acceptance by cable, 1000 tons of ore.
    We accept your prices subject to your General Conditions of Delivery.
    This offer is subject to confirmation.
    This offer is made subject to the goods being unsold on receipt of your reply.
    This offer is made subject to prior sale.
    This tender offer is subject to wtitten or cabled confirmation on receipt of order.
    All deliveries are subject to strikes, lockouts, accidents and other unforseen contingencies.
    The contract is subject to six months’ notice on either side.
    We accept your prices subject to contract terms.

    It is rough luck on me to give a new meaning in my natural lnguage.

    Regards.

    V.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: subject to

    I feel you might be better to see these as interpretations according to context. To me they mostly carry similar connotations that something can happen dependent on other factors, even statements such as "The contract is subject to six months' notice on both sides" and "This offer is subject to confirmation".

    The exception I would make is that a statement like "I am subject to anger" contains the implication that "anger rules me".

  3. #3
    Neillythere's Avatar
    Neillythere is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: subject to

    Hi Vil

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,
    We offer you, subject to your acceptance by cable, 1000 tons of ore.
    We accept your prices subject to your General Conditions of Delivery.
    This offer is subject to confirmation.
    This offer is made subject to the goods being unsold on receipt of your reply.
    This offer is made subject to prior sale.
    This tender offer is subject to wtitten or cabled confirmation on receipt of order.
    All deliveries are subject to strikes, lockouts, accidents and other unforseen contingencies.
    The contract is subject to six months’ notice on either side.
    We accept your prices subject to contract terms.
    V.
    I agree with Anglica, but would add that all the last batch of sentences could be rephrased with "subject to" following the verb "to be", as some of them are, already, with no change to the original meaning, e.g.:

    Our offer of 1000 tons of ore is subject to your acceptance by cable.
    Our acceptance of your prices is subject to your General Conditions of Delivery.
    This offer is subject to the goods being unsold on receipt of your reply.
    This offer is subject to prior sale.
    Our acceptance of your prices is subject to [agreement on] contract terms.

    Hope this clarifies

    Regards

    NT

    PS My good old friend Oxford may also help (or perhaps confuse, as "subject to" can be used either as a noun, adjective, adverb or verb!):

    AskOxford: subject

    subject:

    noun /subjikt/ (not "subject to")
    1 a person or thing that is being discussed, studied, or dealt with.
    2 a branch of knowledge studied or taught.
    3 Grammar the word or words in a sentence that name who or what performs the action of the verb.
    4 a member of a state owing allegiance to its monarch or supreme ruler.
    5 Music a theme, leading phrase, or motif.
    6 Philosophy a thinking or feeling entity; the conscious mind or ego.

    adjective /subjikt/ (subject to)
    1 likely or prone to be affected by (something bad).
    2 dependent or conditional upon.
    3 under the control or authority of.

    adverb /subjikt/ (subject to) conditionally upon.

    verb /sbjekt/ (usu. subject to)
    1 cause to undergo.
    2 bring under one’s control or jurisdiction.

    Also note the change of stressing from the 1st to the last syllable with the verb.

    All I can say after that is:

  4. #4
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: subject to

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your understanding. Thank you also for your useful indications. I am pleased to ascertain the fact that you hold such vews. We are of identical opinions in this case. Maybe with a subtle distinction concerning the interpretation of the expression “I am subject to anger”. My idea was that “I am prone to anger”. I am likely to be affected by anger. I am hot-/quick-/short-tempered. I have a hot/quick temper. I am swift to anger. I am peppery. But I am not mad with anger. I am not embezzled from anger. I am not beside oneself with rage. Both assertions (mine and yours) are poles apart.

    Regards.

    V.

Similar Threads

  1. Subject and Predicate
    By sohala in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2008, 06:39
  2. Whichever one of you
    By Grablevskij in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2007, 09:16
  3. Can vs. May (subject oriented?)
    By peteryoung in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-May-2005, 11:34
  4. Subject Noun
    By Farhaj in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2005, 11:18
  5. Subject of a verb
    By Anonymous in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14-Oct-2003, 07:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •