Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The diphthong in "smoke"

    Almost impossible to answer "why does someone speak in this way" unless you know something about them.

    He may come from a dialectical group, he may be speaking in a foreign language, he may have a hearing disability, he may be using a fashionable accent.

    Who is the person and where does he come from?

  2. #12
    CJ 4 life is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    31
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The diphthong in "smoke"

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Almost impossible to answer "why does someone speak in this way" unless you know something about them.

    He may come from a dialectical group, he may be speaking in a foreign language, he may have a hearing disability, he may be using a fashionable accent.

    Who is the person and where does he come from?
    He's the main character of the videogame GTA San Andreas, of course American, he comes from Los Angeles and speaks AAVE (this doesn't matter though, I heard a lot of different people (males and females) pronounce this diphthong in this way). But first, you confirm that he pronounce "home" like "hawm", right?

  3. #13
    Uncle M is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    120
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The diphthong in "smoke"

    I'm not at all familiar with the way by which Buddaheart explains pronunciation but I do know that in the UK the long O sound is altered to OR by people from the north (Yorkshire, Lancashire) or Scotland, or even Wales:

    Horm (for home), Snor (for Snow) and so on.

    In some dialects, home can become almost hum, or snow snahr.

    (Buddaheart, is there some established practice that describes phonetics and where could I find reference to it?)

    Dave

  4. #14
    CJ 4 life is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    31
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: The diphthong in "smoke"

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortimer View Post
    I'm not at all familiar with the way by which Buddaheart explains pronunciation but I do know that in the UK the long O sound is altered to OR by people from the north (Yorkshire, Lancashire) or Scotland, or even Wales:

    Horm (for home), Snor (for Snow) and so on.

    In some dialects, home can become almost hum, or snow snahr.

    (Buddaheart, is there some established practice that describes phonetics and where could I find reference to it?)

    Dave
    I don't know about Buddaheart, but stick to the point;what you think would be the best phonetic transcription for "home" in the video I linked?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk