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Thread: just x only

  1. #11
    gisele Guest

    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Hi,
    I had always assumed that when it's possible to use "only" in a sentence, the adverb "just" is also (maybe not always but most of the times) a valid option.
    You're right in adding 'maybe not always but most of the time'. 8)

    Given the context, This class is just on Thursday, what's needed is an adverb that expresses exclusively (i.e., only), and not an adverb that expresses exactly ~ merely (i.e., just). :wink:
    Hello Casiopea,

    Thank you!

    Best,
    Gisele

  2. #12
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    Default Re: just x only

    You're welcome. :D

  3. #13
    Susie Smith Guest

    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Quote Originally Posted by Susie Smith
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Hi,

    Two days ago, ...

    (... Does anyone know where on the web I can find a good list of onomatopoeic words in English?)

    ... Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    Săo Paulo, Brazil

    Yes, just and only are synonyms when the meaning is "merely".
    Ufa = Phew

    BTW, do you have a good word for "enrolado"?

    :wink:

    Hi Suzie,


    First of all, thanks for the “phew”! Yes, it rings a bell now. It’s amazing how I forget things easily! As for "enrolado", well, if you’re from or live in Brazil you probably know that this adjective/noun has sundry meanings in Portuguese, so the best English equivalent really does depend on the specific context. My guess, though, is that you’re not thinking, for instance, about curly hair, or twisted pastry or someone who is entangled in some sort of a fix. I imagine it’s more likely an allusion to my wearisome unobjective preambulary blahblahblahness. ... ... Point taken!


    Sure enough, I admit that I often have trouble going straight to the point. Mostly because, well, to be honest, I generally find curves so much more inviting than straight lines! :wink: I’m not oblivious to the fact, however, that in many situations the capacity to trim all excesses, or as some would no doubt prefer to describe as to just cut the crap, is becoming increasingly more necessary - after all, more than ever, time is short, time is money, so in a sense there is really something disturbingly anachronous about coming across people who, in this day and age, still insist on taking detours when they communicate. Moreover, there’s no denying that brevity is the soul of wit. No wonder I’ve never been particularly good at telling jokes. :(


    And yet, what can I do, I find the lure of making parentheses and adding various hues and nuances and flying off at tangents and just basically getting lost in an interminable maze of words ever so hard to resist. It’s such a delicious journey, as I never know beforehand quite where it will take me. I learn so much in the process – there are bound to be discoveries, sudden déjŕ-vus, new resolutions...


    Mind you, in no way am I trying to imply that my propensity to stray and miss the target and in general make ill use of time is some kind of virtue. Actually I think one of the reasons I was born, if not my number one mission in this current incarnation, is to learn to be less “enrolada” - hmm, let’s see… enrolada… perhaps you could say, rambling, digressive, abstruse, circumlocutory, tautologous, long-winded, prolix, more like yakking – at any rate, ever so darn enrolada… … No, I’m not proud of it. This inclination to avoid the quickest route may well be at the root of my chronic problem with time and finance management and overall organization… :(


    …Yes, that’s me… … how well I can see me in all my raw ugly congenital frenzied chaos :? … How painfully aware I am of my need to be more direct, more objective, more vapt-vupt, more monosyllabic, more me Tarzan you Jane. More like, 8) hey babe, let’s get down to business and talk turkey 8) - let’s organize and simplify and clear out and recycle and make room for the new and think ahead and forget the pretty colors and all the nonsense and beware of the stark black-and-white net result looming around the corner... Maybe that’s why it’s always difficult for me to keep my drawers tidy, and I’m always carrying the world in my bags, and the megabucks have so far been eluding me... :( ... Sheer and complete lack of focus! Pay Attention, Gisele! Forget the details! Concentrate on what is really Essential ! Come on, you can do it!


    … Yep…


    Anyway, thanks for the “phew” and for the
    "puxăo de orelha" (= "*a pull in one's ears"* - Brazilian expression - When you give someone a "puxăo de orelha", you're admonishing them, i.e. scolding/censuring them, telling them off. In my original text, posted yesterday, September 11th, 2004, I used the English expression "wake-up call", in an attempt to convey the idea of the Brazilian word "chacoalhada", which is like "shaking" someone, as a way of "waking them up", making them aware of the need to behave differently as they have done something wrong. It seems, though, that "wake-up call" is not quite the same. I wasn't very sure, so I looked it up in some dictionaries and I got the feeling that "wake-up call" is normally used in more threatening, more serious situations, such as major turning points in a person's life, which was not the case in my sentence. Then again, I'm still not sure -maybe "wake-up call'" is appropriate in the context of the posting). (Sorry for the long interposition! In the future, I promise I will try much harder to refrain from making asides and engaging in soliloquy! ) - It’s always good to know how the world perceives us, as this helps us to get an even more crystal-clear picture of ourselves. Of course, it’s quite possible that you hadn’t intended your question about “enrolado” to be a reprimand. That’s beside the point, because the cap fits! Also, I must say that the concoction of this reply is an immensely enjoyable exercise, as it forces me not only to rack my brains trying to dig out and water and give a new lease of life to some words that were withering in my language garden due to neglect but also, and in fact even more importantly, to write in as accurate and earnest and heartfelt a way as I can. Still, I know, I know it' just silly of me - such exaggerated zeal is totally out of place in language discussion forums, so I'd better play by the rules - this way, I´ll bore fewer people, I'll be able to connect with a larger audience, I will save my own time and energy, yep, that's a much more sensible approach! No doubt about it; forums are such a great opportunity for soul-searching and the refinement of our written expression! :D So, once more, thank you! :D

    And now, I’m off, as I behold lovely clean uncluttered space ahead, urging me to step in and make myself as comfortable as possible, and there are so many other pots of gold at the end of the rainbow, just waiting for me to claim them my own, which I must not keep postponing ad infinitum lest I remain forever shackled by samsara... ... Indeed it’s about time I changed my ways.... ....


    ... ... Period.


    … Well, but I'm also so fond of commas! :wink:


    See you around,


    Gisele

    I'm so, so sorry about the misunderstanding my laconism no doubt caused. It was not my intention to puxar your orelha. Longe de mim...... I just wanted to know if you could suggest a good English word for the adjective "enrolado".

    John está todo enrolado. = John is all entangled. OK?
    Pare de me enrolar. = Stop giving me the runaround. (Have a better suggestion?)
    Pare de enrolar. = Stop stalling/beating around the bush. (Better suggestion?)

    John é enrolado. = ?????

    I thought I had a good working knowledge of Portuguese (I live in Brazil, but I'm not from Brazil.); but I didn't know that "enrolado" could be used in the sense of wordiness.

    Regarding uncalled-for verbosity, I'm with François. This sort of thing tends to turn people off. Once again, please forgive me for the misunderstanding. I'd also like to thank the non-Portuguese speakers for being patient. (Yes, I know this is an English forum, but how I long to find a good English equivalent for "enrolado".)

    :wink:

    BTW, Gisele, do you happen to know a good word or two for "cara de pau"?


  4. #14
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: just x only

    [quote="gisele"]
    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele

    Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    Săo Paulo, Brazil
    Yes, "just" can be used in place of "only".

    Here are two examples...

    Here are other ways that we can use "just" in English....

    < refer to X Mode's posting >


    Hello X Mode,

    Thanks for the wealth of examples!

    Best,
    Gisele

    You're welcome. :D

    De nada.

    Ate mais,

    8)

  5. #15
    gisele Guest

    Default Re: just x only

    :D

    Hi Suzie,

    I'm up to my ears in work right now, and I can't really write much. I'll get back to your posting sometime during the week, when I have some breathing space. I just wanted to say hello!

    Let's keep in touch!

    Best,
    Gisele

  6. #16
    gisele Guest

    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele

    Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    Săo Paulo, Brazil



    For more on just x only, click here.

    Gisele

  7. #17
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    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele

    Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    Săo Paulo, Brazil



    For more on just x only, click here.

    Gisele
    That's a nice site. :D Thank you.

    This is what I read: just, and I quote, "could be" interpreted as only because 'only' and 'just' share similar meaning in certain contexts, however--and here's something of added value for your student--only on Thursday' is the more preferred because in that context 'only' expresses one meaning: exlusively, whereas 'just on Thursday' is the least preferred because 'just' expresses a variety of meanings: exactly, merely, solely, etc. :wink:

    All the best, :D

  8. #18
    Steven D's Avatar
    Steven D is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele

    Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    Săo Paulo, Brazil



    For more on just x only, click here.

    Gisele
    Hi Gisele,

    Thanks for that link. I'll have to add whatever I think is missing from my files - some time. I would like to be as complete with "just" as possible.

    There is one thing, however, that did catch my eye.

    7. Perhaps; possibly: I just may go.

    I do not think it is correct to say that "just" means "perhaps" or "possibly" here. The modal "may" means "perhaps" or "possibly". Using "just" before "may" or "might" in this way adds strength or emphasis to the possibility indicated by using "may". Maybe they did not mean to say that "just" actually means "perhaps/possibly", but that's how it looks, and I do not agree with it.

    In that example, as I said, "just" acts as a word that adds emphasis or strength to the statement. It could be seen as an intensifier.

    8) :)

  9. #19
    gisele Guest

    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele

    Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    Săo Paulo, Brazil



    For more on just x only, click here.

    Gisele
    That's a nice site. :D Thank you.

    This is what I read: just, and I quote, "could be" interpreted as only because 'only' and 'just' share similar meaning in certain contexts, however--and here's something of added value for your student--only on Thursday' is the more preferred because in that context 'only' expresses one meaning: exlusively, whereas 'just on Thursday' is the least preferred because 'just' expresses a variety of meanings: exactly, merely, solely, etc. :wink:

    All the best, :D


    Thanks a lot, Casiopea. You're right. As "just" can be used in a much larger number of situations, using "only" seems more appropriate to avoid any ambiguity and make the sentence as clear as possible.

    Gisele
    :D

  10. #20
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    Default Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    As "just" can be used in a much larger number of situations, using "only" seems more appropriate to avoid any ambiguity and make the sentence as clear as possible.

    Gisele
    :D
    Oh, Gisele, I love you. :D You're a great teacher. 8) I feel that you're successful at empowering your students by providing them with all the facts.

    As for the so-called language intruder, the 'erudite' one, pity she couldn't offer your student an explanation for the correction. Time constraints, language barrier, native intuition, whatever the reason, an explanation would have been an added kindness.

    In retrospect though, I feel we could all learn from the situation. Students are often intimidated by "experts"--aren't we all come to think of it; they rarely if ever question the authority. I strongly believe that one of the most important tools language teachers can offer their students is confidence in oneself: When someone corrects you, it's important that you find out the reason for the correction. Don't be shy! Ask. 8)

    All the best, and thank you. :D

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