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Thread: just x only

  1. #21
    gisele Guest

    Re: just x only

    [ Parts of some previous postings by Gisele with doubts that remain ]


    ... Does anyone know where on the web I can find a good list of onomatopoeic words in English?

    ... In my original text, I used the English expression "wake-up call"... I'm still not sure -maybe "wake-up call'" is appropriate in the context of the posting...


    [ second response to Susie Smith's posting ]



    Hi Susie,

    I apologize for my delay in answering you properly. I've really been super busy with work-related matters. See some comments below,
    in italic green, inserted throughout the body of your text, which is in black font.



    I'm so, so sorry about the misunderstanding my laconism no doubt caused. It was not my intention to puxar your orelha. Longe de mim...... I just wanted to know if you could suggest a good English word for the adjective "enrolado".

    Sure, no hard feelings! :D About "enrolado", well, it depends on the context.


    John está todo enrolado. = John is all entangled. OK?

    "Entangled" sounds fine too me, except that it would seem better to complement a bit. John is all entangled in family problems / in debts / etc. I'm not sure, but I think that to just say "John is all entangled" is not very usual in standard English, as used by educated native speakers. I'm not a native, so I'm just using my current intuition. I think the adjective "enrolado" in Portuguese is not completely equivalent to the word "entangled", which is more like a past participle.



    Pare de me enrolar. = Stop giving me the runaround. (Have a better suggestion?)

    Sounds like a very nice equivalent to me! I can't think of a better one.



    Pare de enrolar. = Stop stalling/beating around the bush. (Better suggestion?)

    Again, your rendering sounds great to me! No, I can't think of any better way.



    John é enrolado. = ???

    If what you mean is that John is "confuso / atrapalhado / complicado", then it could be that either 1 - John is usually unclear in the way he expresses himself (because he uses too many words and/or his ideas/thoughts are generally not very well organized), or that 2 - he has a knack of putting himself in complicated situations, fixes. I've thought a lot about how to best convey these two nuances in English, but besides the ones I mentioned in my first reply, suitable for the first connotation, rambling, digressive, abstruse, circumlocutory, tautologous, long-winded, prolix, more like yakking, I haven't been able to think of other possible words.



    I thought I had a good working knowledge of Portuguese (I live in Brazil, but I'm not from Brazil.); but I didn't know that "enrolado" could be used in the sense of wordiness.

    Where are you from? Yes, the adjective "enrolado" may imply unclear prolixity.



    Regarding uncalled-for verbosity, I'm with François. This sort of thing tends to turn people off.

    Yes, all things considered, in general it's better to be as brief as possible! The more I live, the more I agree, yet I keep forgetting, but that's life! :wink:



    Once again, please forgive me for the misunderstanding. I'd also like to thank the non-Portuguese speakers for being patient. (Yes, I know this is an English forum, but how I long to find a good English equivalent for "enrolado".)

    :wink:

    I'm the one who owes you and everyone in the forum an apology - for jumping to conclusions about your intended meaning, and for boring people to death! :wink:



    BTW, Gisele, do you happen to know a good word or two for "cara de pau"?

    That's a tricky one... "cara de pau", like "folgado"... it makes me think of impudent and forward... but these are adjectives, not a noun like "cara de pau".... Hmmm, I wonder what noun can be used to refer to a person whose behavior shows insolent, barefaced effrontery... someone who has the temerity / the chutzpah / the nerve / the cheek / the brass / the gall / etc to do something... What indeed is the best noun equivalent in English to refer to the person? Maybe someone in the forum can help us! I'll let you know if I find out.

    Once more, thank you for your reply. It made me think a lot, and learn a lot too! :D


    Best,
    Gisele

  2. #22
    gisele Guest

    Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele

    Well, to cut a long story short, my question is: Is it ever possible in a sentence that has the adverb “only”, for it to be replaced with "just"?

    Thanks,

    Gisele
    São Paulo, Brazil



    For more on just x only, click here.

    Gisele
    Hi Gisele,

    Thanks for that link. I'll have to add whatever I think is missing from my files - some time. I would like to be as complete with "just" as possible.

    There is one thing, however, that did catch my eye.

    7. Perhaps; possibly: I just may go.

    I do not think it is correct to say that "just" means "perhaps" or "possibly" here. The modal "may" means "perhaps" or "possibly". Using "just" before "may" or "might" in this way adds strength or emphasis to the possibility indicated by using "may". Maybe they did not mean to say that "just" actually means "perhaps/possibly", but that's how it looks, and I do not agree with it.

    In that example, as I said, "just" acts as a word that adds emphasis or strength to the statement. It could be seen as an intensifier.

    8) :)


    Hi X-Mode,

    You're welcome. Regarding "I just may go", I need to think. When I have more time, I'll get back. Or somebody else will!

    Best,
    Gisele

  3. #23
    gisele Guest

    Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    As "just" can be used in a much larger number of situations, using "only" seems more appropriate to avoid any ambiguity and make the sentence as clear as possible.

    Gisele
    :D
    Oh, Gisele, I love you. :D You're a great teacher. 8) I feel that you're successful at empowering your students by providing them with all the facts.

    As for the so-called language intruder, the 'erudite' one, pity she couldn't offer your student an explanation for the correction. Time constraints, language barrier, native intuition, whatever the reason, an explanation would have been an added kindness.

    In retrospect though, I feel we could all learn from the situation. Students are often intimidated by "experts"--aren't we all come to think of it; they rarely if ever question the authority. I strongly believe that one of the most important tools language teachers can offer their students is confidence in oneself: When someone corrects you, it's important that you find out the reason for the correction. Don't be shy! Ask. 8)

    All the best, and thank you. :D

    Hi Casiopea,

    Thank you for the kind words. You're a great teacher too! In fact, everybody can teach us many things!

    Best,
    Gisele

  4. #24
    Susie Smith Guest

    Re: just x only

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele
    [ Parts of some previous postings by Gisele with doubts that remain ]


    ... Does anyone know where on the web I can find a good list of onomatopoeic words in English?

    ... In my original text, I used the English expression "wake-up call"... I'm still not sure -maybe "wake-up call'" is appropriate in the context of the posting...


    [ second response to Susie Smith's posting ]



    Hi Susie,

    I apologize for my delay in answering you properly. I've really been super busy with work-related matters. See some comments below,
    in italic green, inserted throughout the body of your text, which is in black font.



    I'm so, so sorry about the misunderstanding my laconism no doubt caused. It was not my intention to puxar your orelha. Longe de mim...... I just wanted to know if you could suggest a good English word for the adjective "enrolado".

    Sure, no hard feelings! :D About "enrolado", well, it depends on the context.


    John está todo enrolado. = John is all entangled. OK?

    "Entangled" sounds fine too me, except that it would seem better to complement a bit. John is all entangled in family problems / in debts / etc. I'm not sure, but I think that to just say "John is all entangled" is not very usual in standard English, as used by educated native speakers. I'm not a native, so I'm just using my current intuition. I think the adjective "enrolado" in Portuguese is not completely equivalent to the word "entangled", which is more like a past participle.

    You're right about entangled...... I probably would never say that. I'd say that John is in a mess or that John has messed up his life.... something like that.


    Pare de me enrolar. = Stop giving me the runaround. (Have a better suggestion?)

    Sounds like a very nice equivalent to me! I can't think of a better one.



    Pare de enrolar. = Stop stalling/beating around the bush. (Better suggestion?)

    Again, your rendering sounds great to me! No, I can't think of any better way.



    John é enrolado. = ???

    If what you mean is that John is "confuso / atrapalhado / complicado", then it could be that either 1 - John is usually unclear in the way he expresses himself (because he uses too many words and/or his ideas/thoughts are generally not very well organized), or that 2 - he has a knack of putting himself in complicated situations, fixes. I've thought a lot about how to best convey these two nuances in English, but besides the ones I mentioned in my first reply, suitable for the first connotation, rambling, digressive, abstruse, circumlocutory, tautologous, long-winded, prolix, more like yakking, I haven't been able to think of other possible words.



    I thought I had a good working knowledge of Portuguese (I live in Brazil, but I'm not from Brazil.); but I didn't know that "enrolado" could be used in the sense of wordiness.

    Where are you from? Yes, the adjective "enrolado" may imply unclear prolixity.

    I'm an American living in Minas. Maybe this meaning is not commonly used by mineiros.

    Regarding uncalled-for verbosity, I'm with François. This sort of thing tends to turn people off.

    Yes, all things considered, in general it's better to be as brief as possible! The more I live, the more I agree, yet I keep forgetting, but that's life! :wink:



    Once again, please forgive me for the misunderstanding. I'd also like to thank the non-Portuguese speakers for being patient. (Yes, I know this is an English forum, but how I long to find a good English equivalent for "enrolado".)

    :wink:

    I'm the one who owes you and everyone in the forum an apology - for jumping to conclusions about your intended meaning, and for boring people to death! :wink:



    BTW, Gisele, do you happen to know a good word or two for "cara de pau"?

    That's a tricky one... "cara de pau", like "folgado"... it makes me think of impudent and forward... but these are adjectives, not a noun like "cara de pau".... Hmmm, I wonder what noun can be used to refer to a person whose behavior shows insolent, barefaced effrontery... someone who has the temerity / the chutzpah / the nerve / the cheek / the brass / the gall / etc to do something... What indeed is the best noun equivalent in English to refer to the person? Maybe someone in the forum can help us! I'll let you know if I find out.

    Once more, thank you for your reply. It made me think a lot, and learn a lot too! :D


    I think presumptuous also works for "folgado", but in daily speech very few people would say it. As for a noun, it seems that nobody knows one.....umm..... interesting. Thanks for your reply.
    Take care,
    Susie


    Best,
    Gisele

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