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Thread: 'to be'

  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    'to be'

    describe the grammatical function of the verb 'to be':
    +/ He is a world famous singer.
    +/ She has been in London at least twice.
    +/Her letters were not found anywhere.
    +/ They are sitting side by side in the dark.
    +/ He is to go to the station at once if he doesn't want to be late.

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    #2

    Re: 'to be'

    +/ He is a world famous singer. copula verb
    +/ She has been in London at least twice. past participle with a meaning similar to 'go'
    +/Her letters were not found anywhere. auxiliary verb to form the passive
    +/ they are sitting side by side in the dark. auxiliary verb to form the present progressive (continuous)
    +/ He is to go to the station at once if he doesn't want to be late. functioning like a modal, with a sense of obligation like must.


  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'to be'

    Quote Originally Posted by learner
    describe the grammatical function of the verb 'to be':
    +/ He is a world famous singer.
    +/ She has been in London at least twice.
    +/Her letters were not found anywhere.
    +/ They are sitting side by side in the dark.
    +/ He is to go to the station at once if he doesn't want to be late.
    The verb "to be" serves several functions depending on what form it takes.

    He is a world famous singer.
    In that sentence, "world famous singer" describes "He". The verb "is" chiefly acts as a connecting word.

    She has been in London at least twice.
    In that sentence, "has been" describes a state of being. Where has she been? She has been to London. (Normally, "to" is the preposition used.)

    More later (perhaps).

    8)

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