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  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
    thedaffodils is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: UK's Political Party

    You know, the sort of people who rely on the local primary school to teach their children to read and write.


    People who save for a dignified old age. Women who would prefer to look after their own babies instead of leaving them in a Harriet Harman-approved battery farm.


    Men who believe that our troops abroad need more than fine words to protect them.



    I always believed Labour was the party that would look out for these people.


    So why the change of heart? Why now?

    In truth, there was no Eureka! moment.


    No sudden, overwhelming desire to tear off my red silk socialist bustier and run into the warm, tweedy embrace of that nice David Cameron.
    Hi,

    I'm reading a columnist's article in Daily Mail. Below is the URL link for more context. Could you please help me out the following questions? Thanks.

    I've never voted Tory in my life, but now... | the Daily Mail

    Q1: What is the connotation of the below sentence I highlight in blue?

    Men who believe that our troops abroad need more than fine words to protect them.

    Q2: red silk socialist bustier = Labour party's uniform?

    Q3: Eureka= I find it?

    Q4: tweedy embrace = hints David Cameron is from Scotland? Scots wear tweedy, right?
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 29-Apr-2008 at 09:51.

  2. #2
    jamiep is offline Member
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    Default Re: UK's Political Party

    Q1: What is the connotation of the below sentence I highlight in blue?

    Men who believe that our troops abroad need more than fine words to protect them.

    Politicians tend to talk a lot about doing things but often don't actually do much. The sentence implies that if the politicians should put more effort into making sure soldiers have good equipment as they do talking about it.


    Q2: red silk socialist bustier = Labour party's uniform?

    Red is the socialist colour but silk is generally worn by the wealthier. So they are ot really "of the people"

    Q3: Eureka= I find it?

    Q4: tweedy embrace = hints David Cameron is from Scotland? Scots wear tweedy, right?

    No it just means he is well off and enjoys country pursuits like shooting and fishing. The country "gentlemen" wears tweed.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: UK's Political Party

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    ....
    Q3: Eureka= I find it?

    Q4: tweedy embrace = hints David Cameron is from Scotland? Scots wear tweedy, right?
    Just to add to jamiep's comments:

    Q3: You're nearly right about Eureka: 'I have found [it]'. It's what Archimedes is said to have said when his bath-water rose by the volume of the immersed parts of his body'. An Englishman would say 'Got it!'

    So 'a Eureka moment' is a moment of sudden and/or blinding realization of the truth.

    Q4: I really don't know about David Cameron's ancestry, but it's a Scottish name (one of the Lowland Scots, who sided with England against the Highlanders - the McDonalds still haven't forgiven the Camerons for Massacre of Glencoe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    ( - it was the Campbells; but I bet there were a few Camerons there too!))

    Also, there was a tradition of tweed-wearing Scottish-born Tory leaders. The last was Sir Alec Douglas-Hume. David Cameron is a 'new broom', without that stuffy history. But people suspect that at heart he's a traditionalist. So, although I agree with jamiep that he is well-off and enjoys country pursuits, I think you're right too in a way - that there's a whiff* of old-style Toryism about him (possibly with Scottish overtones).

    b

    * "whiff" may be the right word. The dye in Harris Tweed is fixed with ammonia, and the people of Harris traditionally used the cheapest natural source of ammonia; so that the Hebridean euphemism equivalent to the Br English 'May I wash my hands?' was 'Where's your tub?' (a large container of urine, kept outside the back door). So tweed does indeed have a whiff, especially if it gets wet.
    Last edited by BobK; 29-Apr-2008 at 15:06. Reason: Added last sentence

  4. #4
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Default Re: UK's Political Party

    Hi Mr. Jamiep & Mr. Bobk,

    Thanks a lot for your answers. You are very nice.

    Mr. Bobk, David Cameron is from a very wealthy family of Scot with aristocratic background.

    Here is an excerpt about his relevant profile from Wikipedia and the URL link is as below.

    David Cameron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    David Cameron was born in London, but brought up at Peasemore, near Newbury, in the English county of Berkshire,[7] the son of stockbroker Ian Donald Cameron and his wife Mary Fleur Mount the second daughter of Sir William Malcolm Mount, 2nd Baronet.[8] His father was born at Blairmore House near Huntly in Scotland,[9] which was built by Cameron's grandfather Ewen Donald Cameron's maternal grandfather Alexander Geddes[10] who had made a fortune in the grain business in Chicago and had returned to Scotland in the 1880s.[11] The Cameron family were originally from the Inverness area of the Scottish Highlands.[12]

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