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Thread: on one's feet

  1. #1
    Taka is offline Senior Member
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    on one's feet

    The sentences:

    A policeman has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.

    My book interprets "on his feet" literally as "standing up."

    Whaaaat???

    I think it means "in an impromptu situation", otherwise, IMO, it doesn't make sense.

    What do you think, teachers?

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Unless your book is written by someone with a dry sense of humour, I'd stick with your uinterprtation. Otherwise, the logical conclusion is that a seated police officer knows no law.;-0

  3. #3
    Natalie27 Guest

    Re: on one's feet

    Quote Originally Posted by Taka
    The sentences:

    A policeman has to know nearly as much law as a professional lawyer, and what is more, he has to apply it on his feet, in the dark and rain, running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.

    My book interprets "on his feet" literally as "standing up."

    Whaaaat???

    I think it means "in an impromptu situation", otherwise, IMO, it doesn't make sense.

    What do you think, teachers?

    >running down an alley after someone he wants to talk to.[/???
    I don't think there is too much talking going on with a Smith&Wesson 38mm.. in one hand and handcuffs in the other.

    In regards to "he has to apply it on his feet", you probably meant "hands on" as opposed to sitting in one's office like the lawyers do.
    so you might want to say:

    he has to apply himself hands on/ he has to do it hands on/it's a hands on job/it's a hands on experience for a policeman.

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