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Thread: both/ both of

  1. #1
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    Default both/ both of

    Both of you are right. (Correct)
    You both are right. (Correct)
    You are both right. (Correct)

    I feel a bit frustrated(no bother at all, I mean) when explaining why this doesn't sound natural.
    "Both you are right."
    Is there anyone can tell? :)

  2. #2
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    Default Re: both/ both of

    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Both of you are right. (Correct)
    You both are right. (Correct)
    You are both right. (Correct)

    I feel a bit frustrated(no bother at all, I mean) when explaining why this doesn't sound natural.
    "Both you are right."
    Is there anyone can tell? :)
    EX: Both you are right. :(

    With pronouns (i.e., you), Bothis substansive; 'of' is required: Both of you are right.

    Note that, 'Both" refers to two things, people, etc., so we wouldn't be able to get a singular number reading for 'Both of you'. :wink:

    Click here for more...

  3. #3
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    Thank you, Cassie. :D

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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Thank you, Cassie. :D
    I love it when Cassie explains a question. She always hits the nail on the head.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Thank you, Cassie. :D
    I love it when Cassie explains a question. She always hits the nail on the head.
    Stick around. :wink:

  6. #6
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    Yeah, Cas ROCKS my life. :D

    You've always been of great help to me. :D

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Yeah, Cas ROCKS my life. :D

    You've always been of great help to me. :D
    Thank you. :D

  8. #8
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    Compare:
    Subject + are both + Noun or Adv.
    My parents are both teachers. :D
    You are both correct. :D


    Subject + both are + Noun or Adv.
    My parents both are teachers. :( (Why? )
    You both are correct. :D

  9. #9
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    Compare:
    You are both correct.
    You both are correct.


    Both sentences are correct. But I'd like to know if there's any different emphases over them. As to my ears, the first one puts much emphasis on correctness; that is, you are both correct, not wrong. The second one, however, highlights the persons; both of Pete and Josh are right, I'm not refering to Mary and Sue. :wink:


    Am I thinking too much?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Compare:
    You are both correct.
    You both are correct.

    Both sentences are correct. But I'd like to know if there's any different emphases over them. As to my ears, the first one put much emphasis on correctness; that is, you are both correct, not wrong. The second one, however, highlights the persons; both of Pete and Josh are right, I'm not refering to Mary and Sue. :wink:

    Am I thinking too much?
    What about?

    1. You both are correct. ('both' defines 'You' as plural i.e., together, as a pair).

    2. You are both correct. ('both' defines 'You' as separate indiviudals within a pair i.e., you and you)

    Note the ambiguity, though:

    3. You are both correct and fair.
    A. You are both correct and fair. (adjective)
    B. You are both correct and fair. (adverb)

    Note, both *of Pete and Josh. Try, both Pete and Josh. :wink:


    Additionally,

    Quote Originally Posted by encarta
    both has many roles:

    As a pronoun: I like both.
    As an adjective/determiner: I like both boys.
    As a conjunction: Both Mary and John are nice.As an adverb: They are both pleasant and cheerful.

    Its mobility in a sentence is so great that its meaning can become ambiguous. In the last example, it is not immediately clear whether both belongs with “they” or with the complement of the sentence, “pleasant and cheerful”:

    A. They are both pleasant and cheerful.
    B. They are both pleasant and cheerful.

    In speech, intonation will normally clarify the intention. However, when writing, you need to ensure that you are not leaving the reader in doubt.

    Source.
    All the best, :D

    Question to ponder

    Given 1., what's the function of both in 2. and 3.?

    1. Both Pete and Josh are nice. (Conjunction)
    2. Pete and Josh both are nice.
    3. Pete and Josh are both nice.

    Does its function have anything to do with word order? :wink:

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