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Thread: adding -s

  1. #21
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    toward (AmE) and towards (BrE)are interchangeable.
    What does this mean? I don't understand 'AmE' and 'BrE'.

    So both of these are right?
    1. It makes me feel resentment toward it.
    2. It makes me feel resentment towards it

  2. #22
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    AmE = American English
    BrE = British English

    FRC

  3. #23
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    Okay so these are right:
    1. It makes me feel resentment toward it.
    2. It makes me feel resentment towards it

    What if I changed the word?
    3. It makes me feel resentment against it.
    4. It makes me feel resentment againsts it.

    What other words are like this? Is it only 'towards'? Can you give me some examples with sentences? Thanks.

    Are these correct?
    5. Can you give me some examples in sentences? (Does this mean give me some 'examples' with many sentences?)
    6. Can you give me some examples in a sentence? (Does this mean give me some 'examples' in one sentence?

    7 For guys 8,9,10 years old who really know how to ride. (what's the subject and verb here?0
    7 For guys 8,9,10 years old who really knows how to ride.

  4. #24
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Forwards and backwards can take 's', but 'against' can't.

    5&6- you are right.

    7- it should be 'know' because the subject is 'guys'.

  5. #25
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    Forwards and backwards can take 's', but 'against' can't.
    So it doesn't matter what the subject is? It can take -s if the subject is plural or not?



    Are these correct? If not why?

    1. These pieces of art works are very nice.
    2. These pieces of art work are very nice. (Since 'work' is countable, this is incorrect right?)
    3. Your art works is very nice.
    4. Your art works are very nice.

    5. No one wants to get into an accident because of the hassels you have to go through. (Is this right? 'hassel' is countable?)
    6. No one wants to get into an accident because of the hassel you have to go through

  6. #26
    A.Russell is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack
    Forwards and backwards can take 's', but 'against' can't.
    So it doesn't matter what the subject is? It can take -s if the subject is plural or not?



    Are these correct? If not why?

    1. These pieces of art works are very nice.
    2. These pieces of art work are very nice. (Since 'work' is countable, this is incorrect right?)
    3. Your art works is very nice.
    4. Your art works are very nice.

    5. No one wants to get into an accident because of the hassels you have to go through. (Is this right? 'hassel' is countable?)
    6. No one wants to get into an accident because of the hassel you have to go through
    Is his a homework assignment we are doing for you? :)

    Artwork is an uncountable noun.

    Should be:

    "This artwork is very nice."
    "Your artwork is very nice."
    "your works of art are lovely."

    Hassle can be countable or uncountable. Any dictionary will tell you. Please check first.

    I think I've said this before, but you need to study countable and uncountable nouns. Perhaps you can get a book or find a nice private teacher in your area and have a lesson.

  7. #27
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.Russell
    Is his a homework assignment we are doing for you? :)
    We try not to, generally.
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

  8. #28
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    Thanks.

    Actually this isn't a homework assignment you're doing for me. I saw some of the sayings on tv and I didn't understand it if i said it this way or something.

    Hassle can be countable or uncountable. Any dictionary will tell you. Please check first.
    This is what I found for hassle at dictionary.com:
    has·sle ( P ) Pronunciation Key (hsl) Informal
    n.
    1. An argument or a fight.
    2. Trouble; bother.

    I don't get it, where does it say it is countable or not?

    Artwork:
    art·work ( P ) Pronunciation Key (ärtwûrk)
    n.
    Work in the graphic or plastic arts, especially small handmade decorative or artistic objects.
    An illustrative and decorative element, such as a line drawing or photograph, used in a printed work, such as a book.

    Where does it say it is not countable?

  9. #29
    A.Russell is offline Member
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    I don't get it, where does it say it is countable or not?
    If it is a regular dictionary you are using then it might not give you details like that. Get a learner's dictionary. I use the Oxford Wordpower Dictionary for my uni classes. Next to nouns it will say noun followed by [C] or [U] or both to indicate countable or uncountable.

    To save you some cash, here is a link to the Cambridge Dictionary Onlinehttp://dictionary.cambridge.org/. It uses the same convention.

  10. #30
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    Thank you very much. That's very useful.

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