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    #1

    usage of ahead to express the time

    Hi All ,
    how can i use the word ahead to express the time ?
    for example can i say :
    i have to get there five minuts ahead ( before).
    you'd better be there ahead the opening cermony ( before)

    thanks for answering

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Hi Khalid

    1. I have to get there 5 minutes ahead (of time).
    2. I have to get there 5 minutes before.
    3. You'd better be there ahead the opening ceremony.
    4. You'd better be there before the opening ceremony.
    5. I was there ahead of you.
    6. I was there before you.


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    #3

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Soup, is it possible to say

    You'd better be there ahead of the beginning of the opening ceremony.

    I am wondering if ahead has to be followed by 'of' before a noun.

    Thanks.

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    #4

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post

    You'd better be there ahead of the beginning of the opening ceremony.
    Hi, snowcake! A good remark.
    It works to me!

    I am wondering if ahead has to be followed by 'of' before a noun.
    Yes.

    Thanks.
    j

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    #5

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Thank you, banderas.

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    #6

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Snowcake,

    "You'd better be at the ceremony ahead of time" works.
    "...ahead of the beginning of the ceremony" doesn't work.

    ________________
    banderas, try 'It works for me.'


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    #7

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Thanks, Soup.

    Is there any explanation for this, or is it as it is?

    I'm trying to find a rule, but maybe I'm on the wrong track.

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    #8

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Hi

    Have you tried a web concordancer? If not, here is a good place to start: Web Concordancer

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    #9

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hi

    Have you tried a web concordancer? If not, here is a good place to start: Web Concordancer
    If we can say:
    ahead of publication,
    ahead of schedule,
    ahead of the game,
    ahead of the storm,
    ahead of today's metting,
    ahead of today's debate,
    ahead of the handover,
    then why do you see as incorrect to say:
    ahead of ceremony or ahead of the beginning of something?
    Anyway, thanks, Soup, for telling me to say "works for me"
    If you come up with an explanation, please post it.

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    #10

    Re: usage of ahead to express the time

    Hi banderas

    First, "ahead of [the] ceremony" is correct; "ahead of the beginning ..." isn't because it's near redundant. Second, "ahead" collates with 'of time' more so than 'of [noun]':

    1. You'd better be there ahead of time, before the opening ceremony.

    2. You'd better be there ahead of the opening ceremony. (Meaning, before it starts)
    Third, Khalid's example "ahead the ceremony" isn't correct, and Snowcake's example, "ahead of the beginning" doesn't work.


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