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Thread: a failed day?

  1. #1
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    Default a failed day?

    Does "a failed day" make any sense? I mean, a day without finishing your scheduled plans. Thanks. :)

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    Default Re: a failed day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    Does "a failed day" make any sense? I mean, a day without finishing your scheduled plans. Thanks. :)

    Hello Joe,

    I think that it is O.K.
    "It was a failed day"

    Kind regards,
    Dany :D

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    I think it's not, but I'd rather wait for teachers' confirmation.

    FRC

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    I think it's not, but I'd rather wait for teachers' confirmation.

    FRC
    It's okay, but it's one of those things that's not too common. It can be used though.

    failed + noun - This is possible.

    It can be an adjective apart from being the past participle of "fail".

    So, "a failed day" is correct. Google wasn't very revealing with "failed day", but it is a possibility. Here's "a failed attempt". http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...ed+attempt%22+

    failed ( P ) Pronunciation Key (fld)
    adj.
    Having undergone failure: new economic policies intended to replace the failed ones of a past administration.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/search?r=8&q=failed


    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...failed+day%22+

    High on Endurance
    ... Our computers said 275 miles. A big day, but a failed day. The midnight deadline
    had eluded us. August rolled around and the two-mile-high city beckoned. ...
    http://www.silentsports.net/features...endurance.html - 30k - Cached - Similar pages

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    So anything that can be a success works with the 'failed' adjective?

    FRC

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    So anything that can be a success works with the 'failed' adjective?

    FRC

    Grammatically, I would say so. But there are always more grammatical possibilities than practical examples of language.

    There could even be grammatical exceptions, but I can't think of any.

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    Thanks, Dany, Francois and X Mode. I like your elaborate explanation, X Mode. :)

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    I like your elaborate explanation, X Mode.



    Thank you for saying so. I'm glad you like it.

    :) 8)

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    Default Re: a failed day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    Does "a failed day" make any sense? I mean, a day without finishing your scheduled plans. Thanks. :)
    Hold on there. :D

    It was a failure of a day. (OK)
    It was a failed day. (Not OK)
    It was a failed attempt. (OK)

    One can fail at an attempt (i.e., be unsuccessful at attempting something, but one cannot fail at a day (i.e., be unsuccessful at a day); You can be unsuccessful at attempting to complete the day (i.e., The day was a complete failure), but the day itself cannot be described as failed: a failed day. Semantics. :wink:

    All the best, :D

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    Default Re: a failed day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe
    Does "a failed day" make any sense? I mean, a day without finishing your scheduled plans. Thanks. :)
    Hold on there. :D

    It was a failure of a day. (OK)
    It was a failed day. (Not OK)
    It was a failed attempt. (OK)

    One can fail at an attempt (i.e., be unsuccessful at attempting something, but one cannot fail at a day (i.e., be unsuccessful at a day); You can be unsuccessful at attempting to complete the day (i.e., The day was a complete failure), but the day itself cannot be described as failed: a failed day. Semantics. :wink:

    All the best, :D

    Hi Casiopea,

    I think that saying "a failed day" is correct and okay.

    failed - adjective - It can be used to describe "day". It's not the most common thing to say, but it is correct.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...+failed+day%22


    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...failed+day%22+

    High on Endurance
    ... Our computers said 275 miles. A big day, but a failed day. The midnight deadline
    had eluded us. August rolled around and the two-mile-high city beckoned. ...
    http://www.silentsports.net/features...endurance.html - 30k - Cached - Similar pages
    _________________

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