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Thread: a failed day?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    So, "a failed day" is correct. Google wasn't very revealing with "failed day", but it is a possibility. Here's "a failed attempt". Click Here.

    High on Endurance
    ... Our computers said 275 miles. A big day, but a failed day. The midnight deadline had eluded us. August rolled around and the two-mile-high city beckoned. ... Source. - 30k - Cached - Similar pages
    But... Google calculates its findings on the basis of symbols within a given array. That is, whether the array is grammatical or not isn't a factor. In other words, just because Google can find 'failed day' doesn't mean to say that 'failed day' is grammatical, or for that matter acceptable. Of the millions of people who post on-line in English, whose to know who speaks English as a native language, who doesn't, and, moreover, who within that group is actually fluent. :wink: As a test, have Google search known errors.

    All the best, :D

  2. #12
    Steven D's Avatar
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    Forgive me, please, for continuing, but I feel rather strong about this.

    If a marriage can be failed, then why can we not say a day can be failed?

    failed day - failed marriage

    failed [Show phonetics]
    adjective [before noun]
    having not succeeded:
    a failed actress/writer
    She has two failed marriages behind her.

    failed week

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...failed+week%22

    failed month

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...ailed+month%22

    failed year

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...failed+year%22

    Those links have examples from English first language speakers.

  3. #13
    Steven D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    So, "a failed day" is correct. Google wasn't very revealing with "failed day", but it is a possibility. Here's "a failed attempt". Click Here.

    High on Endurance
    ... Our computers said 275 miles. A big day, but a failed day. The midnight deadline had eluded us. August rolled around and the two-mile-high city beckoned. ... Source. - 30k - Cached - Similar pages
    But... Google calculates its findings on the basis of symbols within a given array. That is, whether the array is grammatical or not isn't a factor. In other words, just because Google can find 'failed day' doesn't mean to say that 'failed day' is grammatical, or for that matter acceptable. Of the millions of people who post on-line in English, whose to know who speaks English as a native language, who doesn't, and, moreover, who within that group is actually fluent. :wink: As a test, have Google search known errors.

    All the best, :D

    I understand what you mean. However, I would still maintain that "failed day" is correct. I believe if we take a close look, we can conclude that a fair amount of those links are from people whose first language is English. And they are using "failed" to describe a day, a week, or a month.

    Not trying to prove you wrong here or anything. I just feel quite strong about this. Hope you understand.

    :) 8)

  4. #14
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    Default Re: a failed day?

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Hi Casiopea,

    I think that saying "a failed day" is correct and okay.
    Hi X Mode, :D
    I think it's OK, too, but that doesn't mean I think it's acceptable in terms of correct usage. :wink:

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    failed - adjective - It can be used to describe "day". It's not the most common thing to say, but it is correct.
    I agree that it's not the most common thing to say, and even though I get it, it's fuzzy in terms of semantics.

    All the best, :D

  5. #15
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    the failed days

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...failed+days%22


    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&l...ailed+years%22


    Short-Media Forums
    ... After all the failed years in Houston as the Oilers I so did not want to see that
    team make it to the Superbowl in the same city it let down time and time ...
    http://www.short-media.com/forum/arc...dex.php/t-8228 - 32k - Supplemental Result - Cached - Similar pages

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    I understand what you mean. However, I would still maintain that "failed day" is correct. I believe if we take a close look, we can conclude that a fair amount of those links are from people whose first language is English. And they are using "failed" to describe a day, a week, or a month.

    Not trying to prove you wrong here or anything. I just feel quite strong about this. Hope you understand.

    :) 8)
    I understand; I'm the same way. :D Tenacity is a good quality. :D

    You better prove me wrong--otherwise, how am I going to learn from you? 8)

  7. #17
    Steven D's Avatar
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    Default Re: a failed day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Hi Casiopea,

    I think that saying "a failed day" is correct and okay.
    Hi X Mode, :D
    I think it's OK, too, but that doesn't mean I think it's acceptable in terms of correct usage. :wink:

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    failed - adjective - It can be used to describe "day". It's not the most common thing to say, but it is correct.
    I agree that it's not the most common thing to say, and even though I get it, it's fuzzy in terms of semantics.

    All the best, :D

    I understand the problem you have with it as far as semantics go, but language isn't always logical.

    And I can say that it does "sound good" to me. Apart from proving it through grammar or Google links - I've learned that I can trust what sounds good to me as being correct.

    Once again, I understand the problem you have it with when considering semantics and logic, but, as we know, language is not mathematics.

    failed day - a day of failure - That's how I understand it. And it sounds good to me.

    I'm glad we are able to exchange our points of view in this manner. It's not always possible to do this. :D 8) :)

  8. #18
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    Failed years = wasted years??

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    Default Re: a failed day?

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode

    I understand the problem you have with it as far as semantics go, but language isn't always logical.
    Isn't that the truth!

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    And I can say that it does "sound good" to me. Apart from proving it through grammar or Google links - I've learned that I can trust what sounds good to me as being correct.
    I'm the same way. :D Mind you, English is our native language, whereas for the majority of users here English is not their native language. Native speakers can pick up semantic nuances, whereas for non-native speakers that's not an easy thing to do. As native speakers, we can offer grammaticallity judgements based on our native intuition. But, it's not really what people say that makes X-phrase acceptable or not; it's how many times we've heard people say it that forms our judgements. The more it's used, the more known it becomes, and the more known it becomes the more acceptable it seems. Frequency, though, does not make X-phrase grammatical. There are rules, grammatical rules. If you can show me how 'failed day' is semantically acceptable, then you've won me over. If not, well, then, it remains a matter of frequency.

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    Once again, I understand the problem you have with it when considering semantics and logic, but, as we know, language is not mathematics.
    I see what you mean; mind you, Linguistics adopts symbols used in both logical and mathmatics. So in a way, language has the potential to be quantified--it's just that our concept of mathmatics/logic has yet to evolve in order to quantify language successfully. :wink: Even in higher mathmatics, i.e., astrophysics, random, unquantifiable events exists, so just because we can't seem to quantify X (i.e., provide a solution for what appears to be random events, usage) doesn't mean it's truly random by nature (i.e., illogical in the purest sense). It's simply at the fuzzy, unknown stage; and somewhere out there, there's a reason and a rule.

    Quote Originally Posted by X Mode
    ]failed day - a day of failure - That's how I understand it. And it sounds good to me.
    Not that I disagree, but, nevertheless, what about these?

    A. a failed house
    B. a failed paper
    C. a failed student

    I'm glad we are able to exchange our points of view in this manner. It's not always possible to do this. :D 8) :)
    It's possible at usingenglish.com. 8) It serves to promote friendship, learning, and, above all, human spirit.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Failed years = wasted years??
    That could be, but not necessarily. We learn by trying. We can learn from failure, so I wouldn't say that failed years are wasted years necessarily.

    retrospect


    8) :)

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