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    #1

    momentum and impulse

    "That's dangerous, not only for the driver, but for everyone else on the road. The brake system is designed for a load of 21 tones. When the truck is eight or nine tones overloaded, the momentum doesn't let you stop unless you really stand on the brakes."

    Hi,

    I would like to know if I could use “impulse” instead of ”momentum” in this sentence.

    I also wonder if “momentum” is an informal word. In the negative case, which word should I use casually, please?

    Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: momentum and impulse

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    "That's dangerous, not only for the driver, but for everyone else on the road. The brake system is designed for a load of 21 tonnes. When the truck is eight or nine tonnes overloaded, the momentum doesn't let you stop unless you really stand on the brakes."

    Hi,

    I would like to know if I could use “impulse” instead of ”momentum” in this sentence.

    I also wonder if “momentum” is an informal word. In the negative case, which word should I use casually, please?

    Thanks.
    Momentum is the correct word, meaning the quantity of motion of a moving body, equal to the product of its mass and velocity.

    Impulse is not an alternative in this context. There is no "informal" word that can replace momentum.

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    #3

    Re: momentum and impulse

    Momentum is the impetus of a moving body.It is the product of mass and velocity.
    Impulse is the effect of momentum in a very short period of time .
    So momentum is correct here.
    Last edited by rj1948; 08-May-2008 at 09:45.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: momentum and impulse

    Note:
    American spelling: ton(s)
    British spelling: tonne(s)
    ~R


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    #5

    Re: momentum and impulse

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    Note:
    American spelling: ton(s)
    British spelling: tonne(s)
    ~R
    European spelling (!) = tonne

    We Brits still have tons as well

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: momentum and impulse

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    European spelling (!) = tonne

    We Brits still have tons as well
    Interesting.


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    #7

    Re: momentum and impulse

    RonBee :Yes - but you've won ground with 'program'. The only time we see 'programme' any more is referring to the flyer at a theatre performance. It's all 'TV programs' here now.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: momentum and impulse

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    RonBee :Yes - but you've won ground with 'program'. The only time we see 'programme' any more is referring to the flyer at a theatre performance. It's all 'TV programs' here now.
    The American influence?

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