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    #1

    Broke and Broken



    I know you use broken after an auxiliary verb (has, have or have). My question to you is when do you say broke or broken.

    For instance,

    The copier machine is still broken.
    The copier machine is still broke.

    I think the copier machine is broken.
    I think the copier machine is broken.


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    #2

    Re: Broke and Broken

    The copier broke
    The copier has broken
    The copier is still broken

    You cannot use "broke" with an auxiliary - except in highly colloquial speech.

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    #3

    Re: Broke and Broken

    Quote Originally Posted by MsNyree View Post

    I know you use broken after an auxiliary verb (has, have or have). My question to you is when do you say broke or broken.

    For instance,

    The copier machine is still broken.=damaged
    The copier machine is still broke.=poor, which does not make sense in this sentence.

    I think the copier machine is broken.
    I think the copier machine is broken.
    Both broken and broke and adjectives. Broken means damaged whereas broke means poor (no money).

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    #4

    Re: Broke and Broken

    Hi MsNyree,

    Excuse my intrusiveness but there is an interesting phrase which shouldn’t be neglected namely “go for broke” (AE).

    The phrase go for broke means "to commit all one's available resources toward achieving a goal," as in
    “Our competitors are going for broke to get some of our accounts “.

    Regards.

    V.

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