Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Bassim is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Serbo-Croatian
      • Home Country:
      • Bosnia Herzegovina
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    743
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Racism in Sweden Part one

    Please would you proofread my text.

    It hurts me very much when I see that although we live in the year 2008, racism in Sweden is still present, although to experience its effects one have to live in this country for at least some years and understand all subtle nuances in speech and facial expressions. I still cannot understand that people can hate someone only because of the colour of his skin, his religion and his nationality. Especially, if that person is a stranger and has not have a chance to express himself. I have wondered what kind of life the people live who keep inside themselves such a hatred. How they see the world and the Universe around them? When they have started to hate other people and nations?
    Do they have an ability to understand other's feelings, ideals, traditions?
    Unfortunatly, these are the questions they themselves can only answer.

    I remember when I was a little boy that my father often used to say to me, "My son, never care about a person's, nationality, religion or his material status. It is his character which is most important!" Since he had told me his advice many years have passed and my father has been dead for years but his words have for ever engraved themselves in my mind and probably I will remember them even on my deathbed.
    The other day I met by chance an African man from Congo who I have known for years. He came here as young boy of seventeen and applied for asylum but his application had been rejected and he waited for seven long years and during this time he could neither work nor go to school.
    The same month when he finally got his residence permit he found a job at the airport. When I talked to him he was so happy, finally after so many years his dream has come true. He had big plans, he wanted to marry, to work hard and send money to his family back in Congo.

    When I saw him the next time, about four years had passed and he was not the same optimistic person. He told me that he worked for about three and a half years in a slaughterhouse but could not stand any more. It was not the heaviness of his job which caused him problem, but people around him. Their racist comments, their way of talking to him and treating him without any respect have damaged his self esteem. In the meantime, he got married and his wife gave birth to the two children and he needed a job, but he could not expose himself to ridicule any longer. Swedes are usually very shy people, except when they are drunk and they seldom dare to say what they think about a person in his presence, but instead they have developed a method to show you that they do not like you, that they do not want you among them. For example, in every Swedish company and factory there is a coffee break. People usually sit together and chat, but if they are against you, nobody will sit beside you and if you enter the room they will suddenly change the topic of their discussion and in that way show you that they ignore you and willy-nilly you are going to feel frozen out.
    However, they use this method not only on immigrants, but also on their fellow Swedes. It is very simple, but its effects can be disastrous. A strong individual fights back and does not let himself be bullied, but a weak and sensitive one can in the worst case commit suicide.
    It can happen that an immigrant overreacts and starts shout and insult people who have bullied him but that can also be fatal for his career. The Swedes would tell him that he lack Social competence and because of that he cannot continue in their company.
    Of course, there are many well written rules and laws in this country, but the reality of life usually follows its own unwritten rules. And one of them is,"You should keep quiet and never complain!" That has been drummed into every Swede since they were children. Sometimes, they are chocked when they hear an immigrant complaining about injustices. Their brains have been programmed to believe that they are living in the best country in the world!
    How can one complain about a paradise on the Earth?

    Probably the majority of them are unable to see how many immigrants are treated as second class citizens and how the rest of their lives they have to struggle to keep their dignity unharmed.

    To be continued..

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    It hurts me very much when I see that although we live in the year 2008, racism in Sweden is still present, although to experience its effects one have to live in this country for at least some years and understand all subtle nuances in speech and facial expressions.
    It hurts me very much when I see that although we live in the year 2008, racism in Sweden is still present, although it is quite subtle.

  3. #3
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    I still cannot understand that people can hate someone only because of the colour of his skin, his religion and his nationality.
    I still cannot understand how people can hate someone because of the colour of his skin, his religion or his nationality.

  4. #4
    Snowcake's Avatar
    Snowcake is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    620
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    It hurts me very much when I see that although we live in the year 2008, racism in Sweden is still present, although it is quite subtle.
    I personally would prefer 'even if' instead of 'although'. In my opinion 'even if' is more accurate since racism might, on the one hand, be subtle in Sweden, but it is still present.
    Besides, you would avoid using 'although' twice in this sentence.

  5. #5
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    I personally would prefer 'even if' instead of 'although'. In my opinion 'even if' is more accurate since racism might, on the one hand, be subtle in Sweden, but it is still present.
    Besides, you would avoid using 'although' twice in this sentence.
    Here is an example of the use of even if:
    I'll stay even if he tells me to leave.

  6. #6
    mykwyner is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    I still cannot understand that people can hate someone only because of the colour of his skin, his religion or his nationality. Especially, if that person is a stranger and has not had a chance to express himself. I have wondered what kind of lives the people live who keep such a hatred inside themselves. How do they see the world and the universe around them when they have started to hate other people and nations?
    Do they have an ability to understand other's feelings, ideals, and traditions?
    Unfortunately, these are questions that onlythey themselves can answer.

    I remember that when I was a little boy, my father often said to me, "My son, never care about a person's, nationality, religion or his material status. It is his character which is most important!" Since he told me this advice many years have passed and my father has been dead for many of those years but his words have for ever engraved themselves in my mind and I will probably remember them even on my deathbed.
    The other day, I met by chance an African man from Congo who I have known for years. He came here as young boy of seventeen and applied for asylum but his application had been rejected and he waited for seven long years. During this time he could neither work nor go to school.
    The same month when he finally got his residence permit he found a job at the airport. When I talked to him he was so happy, finally after so many years his dream had come true. He had big plans, he wanted to marry, to work hard and send money to his family back in Congo.

    When I saw him the next time, about four years had passed and he was not the same optimistic person. He told me that he worked for about three and a half years in a slaughterhouse but could not stand any more. It was not the heaviness of his job which caused him problems, but the people around him. Their racist comments, their way of talking to him and treating him without any respect had damaged his self esteem. In the meantime, he got married and his wife gave birth to two children and he needed that job, but he could not expose himself to that ridicule any longer. Swedes are usually very shy people, except when they are drunk, and they seldom dare to say what they think about a person in his presence. Instead, they have developed a method to show you that they do not like you, that they do not want you among them. For example, in every Swedish company and factory there is a coffee break. People usually sit together and chat, but if they are against you, nobody will sit beside you and if you enter the room they will suddenly change the topic of their discussion. In that way show you that they are ignoring you and willy-nilly you feel frozen out.
    However, they use this method not only on immigrants, but also on their fellow Swedes. It is very simple, but its effects can be disastrous. A strong individual fights back and does not let himself be bullied, but a weak and sensitive one can in the worst case commit suicide.
    It can happen that an immigrant overreacts and starts shouting and insulting the people who have bullied him, but that can also be fatal for his career. The Swedes would tell him that he lacks social competence and because of that he cannot continue in their company.
    Of course, there are many well-written rules and laws in this country, but the reality of life usually follows its own unwritten rules. One of those rules is,"You should keep quiet and never complain!" That has been drummed into every Swede since they were children. Sometimes, they are shocked when they hear an immigrant complaining about injustices. Their brains have been programmed to believe that they are living in the best country in the world!
    How can one complain about a paradise on the Earth?

    Probably the majority of them are unable to see how many immigrants are treated as second class citizens and how, for the rest of their lives, they have to struggle to keep their dignity unharmed.

    Some of the corrections I have made are mechanical errors, others are sylistic suggestions. For a non-native speaker, you write English very well.

  7. #7
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    16,571
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    Do they have the ability to understand another's feelings, ideals, and traditions? Unfortunately, these are questions only they can answer.

  8. #8
    Snowcake's Avatar
    Snowcake is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    620
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Racism in Sweden Part one

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    Here is an example of the use of even if:
    I'll stay even if he tells me to leave.
    Thank you, Ron. No chance to escape your critical eyes. I really appreciate that.

    I think 'even if' works in Bassim's sentence too, doesn't it? Perhaps 'even though' would even be a better choice. It's a bit stronger than 'although' and puts more stress on the contrary between 'subtle but present'.


Similar Threads

  1. The Bench, Part two
    By Bassim in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2008, 21:18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •