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  1. #1
    javaid is offline Newbie
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    Question about regular and irregular verbs, some confusing adjectives

    Hello,
    I am not very clear about "regular and irregular verbs. Similarly I am confused about the use of words "cool" and "cold". Moreover the use of "lay" and "laid" also becomes a bit difficult when one has to use them "transitively/intransitively".
    I request guidance with respect to the above mentioned problems.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Re: Question about regular and irregular verbs, some confusing adjectives

    Quote Originally Posted by javaid View Post
    Hello,
    I am not very clear about "regular and irregular verbs.

    The default rule for English is add 'ed' to show the past tense/a finished action. Irregular verbs are remnants from older forms of English when the default 'ed rule was not in place.

    Native speaking children regularize irregular verbs and this is what I recommend ESLs do too, in speaking, until the irregualr form gets set thru use. Memorizing the various forms doesn't help much in speech. I suppose one could speed up acqusition by using irregulars in a real life context, for example,

    [break a piece of spagetti or a pencil lead or a stick then use the irregular form to describe the event;

    I broke the pencil lead.

    I've broken the stick.



    Similarly I am confused about the use of words "cool" and "cold".

    In what way are you confused, Javaid. 'cool' is warmer than 'cold' but these words are highly varialbe to indivividuals.


    Moreover the use of "lay" and "laid" also becomes a bit difficult when one has to use them "transitively/intransitively".
    I request guidance with respect to the above mentioned problems.
    Thanks
    #


    M-W

    lay

    usage lay has been used intransitively in the sense of “lie” since the 14th century. The practice was unremarked until around 1770; attempts to correct it have been a fixture of schoolbooks ever since. Generations of teachers and critics have succeeded in taming most literary and learned writing, but intransitive lay persists in familiar speech and is a bit more common in general prose than one might suspect. Much of the problem lies in the confusing similarity of the principal parts of the two words. Another influence may be a folk belief that lie is for people and lay is for things. Some commentators are ready to abandon the distinction, suggesting that lay is on the rise socially. But if it does rise to respectability, it is sure to do so slowly: many people have invested effort in learning to keep lie and lay distinct. Remember that even though many people do use lay for lie, others will judge you unfavorably if you do.

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