Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: pizza

  1. #1
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    722
    Post Thanks / Like

    pizza

    Len and Joe eat some pizza
    Question: 1) Why pizza but not pizzas here?
    2) My teacher told me to stress on Joe, but I did stress on Len and pizza because this sentence presents new information/. Could you help me out?

  2. #2
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: pizza

    [1] A pizza is a pie; it has slices. 'Some pizza' means slices of the same pizza, not slices of more than one pizza.

    [2] Stress subjects, verbs, nouns, and new information:

    Ex: LEN and JOE EAT some PIZZA.

  3. #3
    mfwills is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    61
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: pizza

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    [1] A pizza is a pie; it has slices. 'Some pizza' means slices of the same pizza, not slices of more than one pizza.
    Is it as simple as that?

    "I eat meat." (Singular noun)
    Just one kind, or a variety? We might say that "a variety of meats was served," and "I ate several different meats," but in common usage, the singular is used.

    "I eat fruit." (Singular noun)
    Same thing.

    The klinker:
    "I eat vegetables," (Plural noun)
    Here's where it gets messy. Why are veggies different? Why do I not eat vegetable? By the same token, why do I not eat fruits and meats (not that it would necessarily be wrong to say it that way, just that it isn't)?

    As regards the original question, "We went out for pizza" or "We ordered pizza delivered" could, in fact, involve one or more than one pie, possibly as many as the number of people involved, yet we still use the singular. If we go to Pizza Hut and each member of the party orders an individual pan pizza, we still went out for pizza, not pizzas. If our delivery order was for two or more pies, we still ordered pizza, not pizzas.

    What I am trying to convey is that there really is no rule. This is one of those usages that simply cannot be pinned down.

  4. #4
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    722
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: pizza

    Hi mfwills,
    so when to use pizzas?

  5. #5
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: pizza

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Hi mfwills,
    so when to use pizzas?
    When you are referring to more than one:

    I shall buy five pizzas from the store on my way home.
    The pizzas in that restaurant are amazing.
    We shall provide seven different pizzas for your guests.

  6. #6
    belly_ttt is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    722
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: pizza

    As regards the original question, "We went out for pizza" or "We ordered pizza delivered" could, in fact, involve one or more than one pie, possibly as many as the number of people involved, yet we still use the singular. If we go to Pizza Hut and each member of the party orders an individual pan pizza, we still went out for pizza, not pizzas
    Hm, the first bold contracts to that of Anglika's
    The second bold, I think if there are 5 of us went downtown and order 5 pizzas yesterday for each of us, I wonder why we call it pizza

  7. #7
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: pizza

    We went out for pizza = we went out for pie/dinner/food. It is a general concept.

    You could equally well say "We went out for a pizza" >> We went out for a curry/a beer and still be talking in general terms.

Similar Threads

  1. went out for pizza
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Nov-2007, 06:07
  2. Also, as well and too.
    By Marceloatp in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-May-2007, 13:09
  3. Pizza
    By iamwkk in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Apr-2005, 18:01
  4. isabella
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Dec-2004, 12:02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •