Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default in the Shakespeare stakes

    Dear teachers,

    Recenty I read the NYT’s article “Remembering Fleming, Ian Fleming” where I noted a blurred for me expression namely “in the Shakespeare stakes”. My attention was focused on the word “stakes”. I know the meaning of the root word “stake” namely: “a piece of wood or metal pointed at one end for driving into the ground as a marker”, “a vertical post to which an offender is bound for execution by burning”, “money or property risked in a wager or gambling game. Often used in the plural” (bet), “a race offering a prize to the winner, especially a horserace in which the prize consists of money contributed equally by the horse owners”, “a share or an interest in an enterprise, especially a financial share”, “Personal interest or involvement” but I couldn’t find the proper words in my natural language for it.

    Would you be kind enough to give me a leg up?

    Fleming, who saw 40 million copies of his books sold in his lifetime but died before the Bond franchise went stratospheric, had no literary pretensions. He described his first Bond book, “Casino Royale,” as “an oafish opus,” and offered further disparagement in a 1963 BBC radio interview. “If I wait for the genius to come, it just doesn’t arrive,” he said. Asked if Bond had kept him from more serious writing, of the kind achieved by his older brother, Peter, a renowned explorer and travel writer, he replied: “I’m not in the Shakespeare stakes. I have no ambition.”

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    420
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: in the Shakespeare stakes

    In my opinion, out of all the meanings you have given 'stakes' refers to: a race offering a prize to the winner..etc”.

    Fleming was using this metaphor loosely to mean that he was not a writer in the same class or league, or even one whom possessed the same brilliance of Shakespeare. Thus, he would be out run in the metaphoric 'race' with the Bard.

    SB

  3. #3
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: in the Shakespeare stakes

    Hi Shakespeare's brother,

    Thank you for your complaisant reply. Thank you also for your plausible explanation.

    Regards.

    V.

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: in the Shakespeare stakes

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Thank you for your complaisant reply.
    A perfectly good word, but in this context not the right one.

    Complaisance implies that someone is trying to make life easier by agreeing with the other person even when not actually in agreement, and is generally used in a negative sense.

    In this sentence, "helpful" is a better word.

  5. #5
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: in the Shakespeare stakes

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your polate remark. Thank you also for your recommendation of a more suitable adjective than the hosen one of me in my original post.

    I have always known the following meanings of the adjective “complaisant”: complaisant = ready to serve; agreeable or ready to do favors for another:
    William has always been complaisant when it comes to work in the community.

    But I had another look in Dictionary and as a result I discovered the truth regarding the word in question which confirmed your statement. Really, the meaning of this word which I founded in the Dictionary namely “showing a cheerful willingness to do favours for others” "to close one's eyes like a complaisant husband whose wife has taken a lover" does not fit in here (this is not the right word here).

    Thank you again for your directions.

    Regards.

    V.

Similar Threads

  1. Selling one's stakes
    By Bushwhacker in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Feb-2008, 21:57
  2. Shakespeare
    By Lenka in forum Literature
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 20-Jul-2007, 21:18
  3. Shakespeare
    By Emanuelli in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-Jul-2007, 12:29
  4. up the stakes
    By beeja in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2004, 10:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk