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  1. #1
    azkad's Avatar
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    Post Grammar and structure

    Dear teachers, modrators and friends,
    I am currently engaged in a translation process of the "History" of Rabghuzi which is largely a scientific work. Would you please proofread this extract for me to see whether everything with the translation is going smoothly. I appreciate any comments concerning the grammar and structure of the translation. Thanks in advance.


    The Turkic languages, being predominantly overused within the outskirts of the Islamic world, modified their vocabulary owing to extensive borrowings from the Arabic and Persian languages. This process tightly connected with a multiyear and deep Islamization of the Turkic people of eastern and northeastern frontiers of the Islamic world entailed transformations in the word stock of the language. The point primarily concerns the substitution of the Turkic languages for the Arabic and Persian ones that can as well be regarded as the enrichment of vocabulary. The syntax of the language was also every so often under the influence of those changes. Under such circumstances, one and the same work, accepting modifications, naturally adapts to an exact language context. In fact, the partiality of a copier that was largely dependent on the customer and buyer gets spread to a changing religious situation which impels a copier to curtail or even redo certain parts of the work. So, the more ancient the copy of a specific Turkic manuscript, the more chances there are to reveal primeval state both in terms of language and ideology.
    This can in full measure be ascribed to the manuscripts of the “History” of Rabghuzi. However, despite rather numerous investigations, the chronological identification of well-preserved manuscripts of the “History” of Rabghuzi and their dating still remain a topical question.
    The original of the work, that is, the autograph did not remain. The copies that are quite well-known and put into scientific circulation, recopied in different regions in the 14th-19th centuries are kept in separate depositories and museums of the world. Currently, specialists regard the following copies as the ancient copies of the “History” of Rabghuzi

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Quote Originally Posted by azkad View Post
    Dear teachers, modrators and friends,
    I am currently engaged in a translation process of the "History" of Rabghuzi which is largely a scientific work. Would you please proofread this extract for me to see whether everything with the translation is going smoothly. I appreciate any comments concerning the grammar and structure of the translation. Thanks in advance.


    The Turkic languages, being predominantly overused [what do you mean by this?]within the outskirts of the Islamic world, modified their vocabulary owing to extensive borrowings from the Arabic and Persian languages. This process, tightly connected with a multiyear [what do you mean by this?] and deep Islamization of the Turkic people on the eastern and northeastern frontiers of the Islamic world, entailed transformations in the word stock of the language. The point primarily concerns the substitution of the Turkic languages for the Arabic and Persian ones that can also be regarded as the enrichment of vocabulary. The syntax of the language was also every so often under the influence of influenced by those changes. Under such circumstances, one and the same work, accepting modifications, naturally adapts to an exact language context. In fact, the partiality workof a copier who is largely dependent on the customer and buyer [delete - not necessary] gets spread to might be influencd by a changing religious situation which would impel the copier to curtail or even redo certain parts of the work. So the more ancient the copy of a specific Turkic manuscript, the more chances there are that a primeval state both in terms of language and ideology is revealed.

    This can in full measure be ascribed to identified in/traced in the manuscripts of the “History” of Rabghuzi. However, despite rather numerous investigations, the chronological identification of well-preserved manuscripts of the “History” of Rabghuzi and their dating still remain a topical question.

    The original of the work, that is, the autograph copy, no longer exists. The copies that are quite well-known and put into scientific circulation, recopied in different regions in the 14th-19th centuries, are kept in separate depositories and museums of the world. Currently, specialists regard the following copies as the ancient copies of the “History” of Rabghuzi
    .

  3. #3
    azkad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Dear Anglika,
    That is indeed very helpful of you to consider this lengthy post, I do appreciate your help and wish you all the best in your life.

    Overused -- used excessively, utilized by many
    multiyear -- something that developed within many years

    Is that correct?

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Quote Originally Posted by azkad View Post
    Dear Anglika,
    That is indeed very helpful of you to consider this lengthy post, I do appreciate your help and wish you all the best in your life.

    Overused -- used excessively, utilized by many
    multiyear -- something that developed within many years

    Is that correct?

    "Over-used" - it is correct as a definition, but I was wondering how Turkic could be "over-used". It seems odd to say a language can be overused.

    "multiyear"- I would change this to tightly connected with a deep Islamization over many years of the Turkic people on the eastern and northeastern frontiers of the Islamic world

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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Azkad, what do you mean by "the outskirts of the Islamic world'?

    (If someone says that a language is overused that person means that that language is spoken to too great an extent.)

    ~R

  6. #6
    azkad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    Azkad, what do you mean by "the outskirts of the Islamic world'? That is to say, within the boundaries or simply within the Islamic world. Do you have any other ideas?

    (If someone says that a language is overused that person means that that language is spoken to too great an extent.)

    ~R
    Anyway, thank you very much, RonBee.

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  8. #8
    azkad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "Over-used" - it is correct as a definition, but I was wondering how Turkic could be "over-used". It seems odd to say a language can be overused. Isn't it possible to say "English is one of the most overused languages of the world"?

    "multiyear"- I would change this to tightly connected with a deep Islamization over many years of the Turkic people on the eastern and northeastern frontiers of the Islamic world
    Looking forward to receiving the soonest reply, thanks a lot.

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    azkad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    Thanks for the reference; I have jumped to that page and looked up the word. I learnt that the dictionary does not support the word "outskirts" in the meaning that I am providing. As a native speaker, could you tell me please whether "outskirts" can be used in the figuraive sense? Should I replace "outskirts" with another more suitable word?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Grammar and structure

    Quote Originally Posted by azkad View Post
    Should I replace "outskirts" with another more suitable word?
    Definitely. Also, you can say that English is an overused language, but that would indicate that you disapprove of English as a language or at least that you think it is used too much.


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