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  1. #1
    enydia is offline Member
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    Default the tense of a sentence

    Hi, Teachers.

    I saw this sentence from a reading material:
    Remember that you will die, that everything ends, and that happiness comes not in denying this but in living with it.

    I think it's a very nice sentence, isn't it? But I don't know why the writer used 'everything ends' but not 'everything will end.' In my opinion, the former one sounds that everything is ending. Can you give some advice?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    banderas's Avatar
    banderas is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hi, Teachers.

    I saw this sentence from a reading material:
    Remember that you will die, that everything ends,

    why the writer used 'everything ends' but not 'everything will end.' In my opinion, the former one sounds that everything is ending.
    Thanks in advance.
    Hi, Enydia,
    This is how I see it:
    Everyone dies eventually, everyting always ends. It is natural.
    And you will die because everything ends so your life will end too.

  3. #3
    enydia is offline Member
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Hi, Teachers.

    I just saw another sentence in Oxford dictionary that have confused me for the similar reason:
    She takes her finals next summer.

    Why it use 'takes' but not 'will take' with 'next summer'?
    Can you give me some advice again?

    Thank you very much in advance.

    Enydia ^_^

  4. #4
    Clark is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Present Simple can be used for a future action when something happens according to a timetable, etc.

    e.g. The ship arrives at 10 a.m. tomorrow.

    or when you want to sound very categorical

    e.g I am busy tomorrow.

  5. #5
    Snowcake's Avatar
    Snowcake is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    Hi, Enydia,
    This is how I see it:
    Everyone dies eventually, everyting always ends. It is natural.
    And you will die because everything ends so your life will end too.


    For this reason I'd say the present tense would also work, so 'will' can be omitted.

    Remember that you die ....

    As for me, there is no point in using 'will' in this sentence because it is certain that we all die one day. Dying can be seen as a natural law, as in:
    The sun rises in the east. It is neither a prediction nor a voluntary decision.
    Simple present makes more sense to me in the given example.

    Anyone agree or disagree?

    Last edited by Snowcake; 24-May-2008 at 16:03.

  6. #6
    tzfujimino's Avatar
    tzfujimino is online now Key Member
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hi, Teachers.

    I saw this sentence from a reading material:
    Remember that you will die, that everything ends, and that happiness comes not in denying this but in living with it.

    I think it's a very nice sentence, isn't it? But I don't know why the writer used 'everything ends' but not 'everything will end.' In my opinion, the former one sounds that everything is ending. Can you give some advice?

    Thanks in advance.

    Hi.
    I think the speaker that said "Remember that you will die....that everything ends..." wants to "soften" or "alleviate" his/her tone.
    We all know we all die, (I'm not really sure about the context. It may well be a saying, proverb or something like that.),but...maybe, the listener (probably, an inpatient, I imagine.) is so afraid of dying. What would you say to him/her? In such a case, wouldn't it be better to say "you will die" instead of just saying "you die."???

    I'm not really sure! I was just talking to myself!!!
    Let's wait for others to respond to this one.

  7. #7
    banderas's Avatar
    banderas is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post

    Dying can be seen as a natural law, as in:
    The sun rises in the east. It is neither a prediction nor a voluntary decision.
    Simple present makes more sense to me in the given example.

    Anyone agree or disagree?
    I agree wholeheartedly!!!

  8. #8
    tzfujimino's Avatar
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post


    For this reason I'd say the present tense would also work, so 'will' can be omitted.

    Remember that you die ....

    As for me, there is no point in using 'will' in this sentence because it is certain that we all die one day. Dying can be seen as a natural law, as in:
    The sun rises in the east. It is neither a prediction nor a voluntary decision.
    Simple present makes more sense to me in the given example.

    Anyone agree or disagree?

    Yes, I agree with you!

  9. #9
    banderas's Avatar
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    In such a case, wouldn't it be better to say "you will die" instead of just saying "you die."???
    Hi, Fuji,
    I will die (one day) because everyone dies ( every day, every minute, somewhere). It is the law of nature.
    "I die" does not work as it implies something that happens regularly.

  10. #10
    tzfujimino's Avatar
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    Default Re: the tense of a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    Hi, Fuji,
    I will die (one day) because everyone dies ( every day, every minute, somewhere). It is the law of nature.
    "I die" does not work as it implies something that happens regularly.
    Yes! I quite agree with you, banderas!
    What about "you die" vs "you wil die"?

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