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  1. #1
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    Default The verb 'to cope'

    Is it valid to say that a situation is 'copable'?

  2. #2
    fantastic is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: The verb 'to cope'

    did u look up the dictionary ?

    i dont think there is an adjective for the verb cope.



    NOT A TEACHER.

  3. #3
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    Soup is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The verb 'to cope'

    Copable means able to cope with--it's not in any of the dictionaries online; however, that doesn't mean it's not a word. Rather, it's more likely that it has yet to be added--one day, after it's been used a lot more, that's all. Speakers are using it today, however. Just one example, e.g., the pain is copable or copable pain (Source).

    Your example, the situation is copable, makes sense--I can understand its meaning. It's short for we can cope with the situation. Whether it is accetable or not depends on the situation and the person you ask.

    Last edited by Soup; 25-May-2008 at 05:43.

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