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Thread: neither

  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    neither

    Hi,

    Can I say NEITHER OF THE CHILDEREN WANTS? Or is it NEITHER OF THE CHILDREN WANT?
    Thank you so much,


    • Join Date: Sep 2004
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    #2
    I am not a native speaker.
    I am just a learner.

    In the statement "neither of the children...", the verb refers to "niether", NOT children. So the answer is:

    Neither of the children WANTS.

    It is what I think.
    Any comment is welcome.

  2. Dany's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by adriana
    Hi,

    Can I say NEITHER OF THE CHILDEREN WANTS? Or is it NEITHER OF THE CHILDREN WANT?
    Thank you so much,

    Hello Adriana,

    I would say, that "NEITHER OF THE CHILDREN WANT" is correct.

    You know that you have to use by HE, SHE, IT " s"
    Unless it is a form of PLURAL (as in this sentence)
    "Neither" you would only use, when there are more than one children.
    That's why you have to use "want" without "s".

    Kind regards,
    Dany :D


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #4
    Yes, it takes an 's'.
    "Neither of the children WANTS" is correct.

    FRC

  3. Dany's Avatar

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Yes, it takes an 's'.
    "Neither of the children WANTS" is correct.

    FRC
    Ok, you have persuaded me.
    Sorry for my fale

    Kind regards,
    Dany

  4. Dany's Avatar

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    #6
    By the way.

    Can someone explain me, why I have to use 's' ???

    Thanks a lot.

    Dany

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by adriana
    Hi,

    Should I use, Neither of the children wants... or Neither of the children want... ?

    Thank you so much.
    Hi

    The traditional rule holds that neither is grammatically singular:

    EX: Neither wants to go to school. (OK)
    EX: Neither child wants to go to school. (OK)
    EX: Neither children wants to go to school. (Not OK)
    EX: Neither children want to go to school. (Not OK)

    However, if neither is followed by of and a plural noun, it is often used with a plural verb, like this,

    EX: Neither of the children want to go to school. (OK)

    Source

    But,

    EX: Neither of the children wants to go to school. (OK)

    All the best, :D


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Dany
    By the way.

    Can someone explain me, why I have to use 's' ???

    Thanks a lot.

    Dany
    Sorry -- I should have made a more explanatory reply. I get lazy with all these good teachers around.

    FRC

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Sorry -- I should have made a more explanatory reply. I get lazy with all these good teachers around.

    FRC
    Bah. Your contributions are wonderful. 8) :D

  7. Dany's Avatar

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    #10

    Re: neither

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by adriana
    Hi,

    Should I use, Neither of the children wants... or Neither of the children want... ?

    Thank you so much.
    Hi

    The traditional rule holds that neither is grammatically singular:

    EX: Neither wants to go to school. (OK)
    EX: Neither child wants to go to school. (OK)
    EX: Neither children wants to go to school. (Not OK)
    EX: Neither children want to go to school. (Not OK)

    However, if neither is followed by of and a plural noun, it is often used with a plural verb, like this,

    EX: Neither of the children want to go to school. (OK)

    Source

    But,

    EX: Neither of the children wants to go to school. (OK)

    All the best, :D

    Hello Casiopea,

    so I was still right with my explanation? :D
    Is there any difference between the last sentences of you (in refer)?

    I have also looked in one of a book of me. There was a sentence like this, and it was used with 's'. Befor that I was sure, that I don't have to use 's'. Now I'm really uncertain.
    With your link, I wouldn't be slier :(

    Dany

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