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  1. #21
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    We would generally say the kitchen window, unless there was a reason to specify the particular window.

    I have to report that the kitchen's window was rotten, but the bedrooms' windows were sound.
    So when do I use 'object's object' then, Anglika? I'm quite confused.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Barb D, RonBee and Anglika, I'm getting more confused. Some information contadict the others. Which is which?

  3. #23
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Quote Originally Posted by paochai01 View Post
    Barb D, RonBee and Anglika, I'm getting more confused. Some information contadict the others. Which is which?
    No, that is inaccurate. Some opinions contradict other opinions. When one person says that a certain form is never used then another person says "Yes, it is" and backs up that opinion with examples of its use, who do you believe?








  4. #24
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    I was trying to think of a rule to suggest, but I think you need to simply read as much as you can and see what feels natural over time.

    You're pretty safe always using "the world's..." and a day ("Tuesday's performance...")

    If you want to show a contrast (this table's...) you can use the 's.

    If you want to speak of a GENERAL class of things, then use the singular noun: Kitchen tables come in many shapes and sizes. Window treatments make a room look pretty.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Quote Originally Posted by paochai01 View Post
    So when do I use 'object's object' then, Anglika? I'm quite confused.
    paochai01, either phrase works. The more common kitchen window is shorten than window in the kitchen and kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the window in the kitchen.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen window.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    paochai01, either phrase works. The more common kitchen window is shorter than window in the kitchen and kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the window in the kitchen.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen window.
    Note:
    All of them are possible, but you are probably only going to hear the third one ("kitchen window").

  7. #27
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    RonBee:
    No, that is inaccurate. Some opinions contradict other opinions. When one person says that a certain form is never used then another person says "Yes, it is" and backs up that opinion with examples of its use, who do you believe? - Sorry. I mean, opinions. Anyway, what if the person who said that a certain form is never used actually has the better or more accurate information but just can't explain it further?

    BarbD:
    I was trying to think of a rule to suggest, but I think you need to simply read as much as you can and see what feels natural over time.

    You're pretty safe always using "the world's..." and a day ("Tuesday's performance...")

    If you want to show a contrast (this table's...) you can use the 's.

    If you want to speak of a GENERAL class of things, then use the singular noun: Kitchen tables come in many shapes and sizes. Window treatments make a room look pretty.-Great! This is very interesting. I'm gettin' it. What about others? Could you tell me more? Like the practical usage of object of the object vs object's object vs object object..

    Soup:
    paochai01, either phrase works. The more common kitchen window is shorten than window in the kitchen and kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the window in the kitchen.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen window. -Is shorten? Do you mean 'is shorter'? Sorry. But I suppose you are not tellling me to use whichever is shorter, right?

    RonBee:
    Note:
    All of them are possible, but you are probably only going to hear the third one ("kitchen window").-Yeah, I somewhat felt it was the best option. Thanks, RonBee!

    Guys, it seems sometimes I know which to use when but sometimes I don't.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Quote Originally Posted by paochai01 View Post
    Soup:
    paochai01, either phrase works. The more common kitchen window is shorten than window in the kitchen and kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the window in the kitchen.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen's window.
    Ex: Look! There's a snail on the kitchen window. -Is shorten? Do you mean 'is shorter'? Sorry. But I suppose you are not tellling me to use whichever is shorter, right?
    It's a typo. The word is 'shorter'. The shortest one always seems to be more common.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    The shortest one always seems to be more common. - Awesome. Does it apply most of the time? Using the shortest?

  10. #30
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    Default Re: A question ????????

    Quote Originally Posted by paochai01 View Post
    The shortest one always seems to be more common. - Awesome. Does it apply most of the time? Using the shortest?
    I would say yes. (People are lazy.)


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