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  1. #1
    hsb is offline Junior Member
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    Question Difference in meaning

    Dear teachers,

    What is the difference in meaning of these two sentences?When should I use second type of structure? Please explain & give some other examples if possible.

    1) what are you looking at?

    2) What you are looking at?

  2. #2
    Harry Smith's Avatar
    Harry Smith is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by hsb View Post
    Dear teachers,

    What is the difference in meaning of these two sentences?When should I use second type of structure? Please explain & give some other examples if possible.

    1) what are you looking at?

    2) What you are looking at?
    While asking questions you can't say; What you are looking at? Consequently your first sentence is correct. Your second will be correct if you ask an indirect question. example: Can you tell me what you are looking at?Cheers!

  3. #3
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by hsb View Post
    Dear teachers,

    What is the difference in meaning of these two sentences?When should I use second type of structure? Please explain & give some other examples if possible.

    1) What are you looking at?

    2) What you are looking at?
    The first one is a normal English sentence. The second one is not an English sentence. (It could be a part of a sentence, as Harry Smith pointed out.)


  4. #4
    Harry Smith's Avatar
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    The first one is a normal English sentence. The second one is not an English sentence. (It could be a part of a sentence, as Harry Smith pointed out.)

    Thanks Ron for supporting my point of view. It's summer in the air in Moscow!!!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Smith View Post
    Thanks Ron for supporting my point of view. It's summer in the air in Moscow!!!
    Same here. (It's early summer in Charlotte. (Technically, it's not summer yet, but summer weather is here. Also, Memorial Day is "officially" the start of summer.))

    You're welcome.

  6. #6
    hsb is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Thank you very much Harry Smith & RonBee for replying.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Does anyone remember a song by Madonna, Vogue?

    At the very beginning of the song, I recall hearing her whisper "What you're looking at!". It is not written in the lyrics I've found, so I could have misheard it. It could be "What you looking at!".

    Anyway, I'm not saying it is correct, but I was wondering if, in a highly colloquial, oral context, it could be heard.

  8. #8
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Difference in meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by Kraken View Post
    Does anyone remember a song by Madonna, Vogue?

    At the very beginning of the song, I recall hearing her whisper "What you're looking at!". It is not written in the lyrics I've found, so I could have misheard it. It could be "What you looking at!".

    Anyway, I'm not saying it is correct, but I was wondering if, in a highly colloquial, oral context, it could be heard.
    Yep.


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