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Thread: as or like????

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Nah, it does not do to take back a medal from someone. What do you mean, they do it all the time?
    Anyway, that's the risk of deadpan humor

    FRC
    Maybe we're just too thick-skinned?

    An example of deadpan humor, that people might get
    Why did the squirrel fall out of the tree?
    It was dead. :?

    All the best, :D


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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    You be the judge, but I thought you had had enough of the weird jokes not to put this one past me

    FRC
    English Q:
    > You be the judge, but...

    Why "be"? Seems gramatically wrong to me...
    Would anyone mind explaining to me?


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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Wai_Wai
    English Q:
    > You be the judge, but...

    Why "be"? Seems gramatically wrong to me...
    Would anyone mind explaining to me?
    I think imperative is used here to ask people to judge themselves.

    Be the judge yourself. :D
    You :D be the judge. :D Subject before an imperative is somewhat a bit emphatic.

    What do you think? :wink:

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    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by blacknomi
    Quote Originally Posted by Wai_Wai
    English Q:
    > You be the judge, but...

    Why "be"? Seems gramatically wrong to me...
    Would anyone mind explaining to me?
    I think imperative is used here to ask people to judge themselves.

    Be the judge yourself. :D
    You :D be the judge. :D Subject before an imperative is somewhat a bit emphatic.

    What do you think? :wink:
    Be the judge yourself seems correct . You be the judge is more emphatic.

    As I say I do work myself . (Emphatic form )


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    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by alexandre42
    Be the judge yourself seems correct . You be the judge is more emphatic.

    As I say I do work myself . (Emphatic form )

    I do think we think it the same way. :D :D :D :D :D

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Wai_Wai
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    You be the judge, but I thought you had had enough of the weird jokes not to put this one past me

    FRC
    English Q:
    > You be the judge, but...

    Why "be"? Seems gramatically wrong to me...
    Would anyone mind explaining to me?
    You be the judge means, you decide.

    Structure
    You = the judge (Subject = Subject complement)
    be (Linking verb)

    Imperative
    (You) Be the judge ~ (You) Decide.

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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by Wai_Wai
    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    You be the judge, but I thought you had had enough of the weird jokes not to put this one past me

    FRC
    English Q:
    > You be the judge, but...

    Why "be"? Seems gramatically wrong to me...
    Would anyone mind explaining to me?
    You be the judge means, you decide.

    Structure
    You = the judge (Subject = Subject complement)
    be (Linking verb)

    Imperative
    (You) Be the judge ~ (You) Decide.

    Thank for clarification
    :)

  3. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #28
    Quote Originally Posted by alexandre42
    Thanks for the clarification.
    :)
    You're welcome. :D

    Also try,

    Thanks for clarifying it (for me).


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    #29
    > You be the judge

    I wonder if it forms as a complete sentence alone (if so, is "be" the verb)
    Can I apply it to other cases too (ie using its structure to form other sentences)?
    eg:
    - You be a gentleman. You have to be as politeas possible.
    - Students be smart, ok?


    And from "You be the judge", it indeed tells you to make your own judgment.
    So if I say "you be the mother", I might indeed wish to say something like "you should act like a typical mother to take care and loveyour children.

    That means it is not taken literally. It doesn't just tell you to be a mother; be a judge; be a fireman etc. It is to tell you to act like the typical characteristics of a mother/judge/fireman etc.

    Confirm my ideas (if possibe). Thanks!

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Wai_Wai
    I wonder if it forms as a complete sentence alone (if so, is "be" the verb)
    EX: You be the judge.

    The above example is a complete sentence. The subject is "You" and the verb is "be". It's an imperative structure, so the verb is in its base form:

    EX: Do your homework. (i.e., You do your homework)
    EX: Eat your dinner. (i.e., You eat your dinner)
    EX: Be the judge. (i.e., You be the judge)
    EX: You be the judge. (Imperative; "You" is added for emphasis)

    Note that, "You be the judge" is a linking structure. The subject and its complement are joined by a linking verb, 'be',

    Subject = Subject Complement: You = the judge

    'You' functions as the Subject and 'the judge' functions as a predicate noun: It renames the Subject.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wai_Wai
    Can I apply it to other cases too (ie using its structure to form other sentences)?
    eg:
    1. You be a gentleman. You have to be as politeas possible.
    2. Students be smart, ok?
    1. is OK as an imperative, but 2. is not OK. Imperative verbs work best with active verbs, because the purpose of the Imperative mood is to get people to ACT.

    Using linking 'be' works, too, but only with a predicate noun that's associated with a verb, for example,

    to judge (Verb),
    the judge (Noun),
    You be the judge (Predicate noun)
    You judge (Active verb)

    And from "You be the judge", it indeed tells you to make your own judgment. So if I say "you be the mother", I might indeed wish to say something like "you should act like a typical mother to take care and loveyour children.
    If the predicate noun is not associated with a verb, it's usually the case that 'be' is synonymous with act as if you are + (Predicate noun), like this,

    EX: You be the mother. (Imperative) OK
    EX: You act as if you are the mother. (Active verb; Imperative) OK
    EX: Act as if you are the mother ~ You be the mother. OK

    All the best, :D

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