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Thread: this is cake

  1. #1
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    Default this is cake

    I show my friend a picture of a cake

    Which is the most natural sentence?

    This is a cake
    This is cake

    I like birthday cakes
    I like birthday cake

  2. #2
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: this is cake

    This is a cake
    I like birthday cakes

  3. #3
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    Default Re: this is cake

    This is a cake
    The picture would show a whole cake, whether a large cake to be cut, or a small individual cake.

    This is cake
    You might say this to the dry-cleaner when you take in a piece of clothing, to indicate the nature of some greasy (cream), reddish (jam or icing) stain, so he knows how to remove it. Or a stain on the carpet after the party!
    Another way might be if somebody totally new to English really didn't know the difference between biscuits and cake, and you showed them a picture of each, and pointed to it and said, "This is cake." Usually, if it was a slice of cake, that is how we would refer to it:" "this is a slice of cake", "This is a piece of cake", rather than just, "This is cake."

    I like birthday cakes
    Talking about the look of birthday cakes in general, the decoration of them etc

    I like birthday cake
    You like the taste!
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Jun-2008 at 12:19.

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: this is cake

    David's 'a piece of cake' reminds me of an interesting idiom (maybe just Br Eng). Something (anything) that's very easy is 'a piece of cake'; sometimes we use 'it's a cinch' with the same meaning; but as that idiom was born in America, referring to the last thing you did before mounting a horse, I suspect that in Am English it may mean something more like 'I'm ready to go' Does it?

    Example: 'The exam was a piece of cake/a cinch.' (As I say, this may only apply to Br Eng).

    b

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