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Thread: A lot of

  1. #1
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    Default A lot of

    Are these correct? If not, why?

    1. That is a lot of apply juice you are buying.
    2. That is a lot of corn you are buying.
    3. That is a lot of corns you are buying. (If this is incorrect, how can I correct this?)
    4. That are a lot of corns you are buying.
    5. Those are a lot of corns you are buying.
    6. That is a lot of dishes you have to wash.
    7. That is a lot of dish you have to wash. (Is this incorrect? It doesn't sound right.)
    8. Those are a lot of dish you have to wash.
    9. Those are a lot of dishes you have to wash.

    What is the difference in meaing between these two?
    10. That is a lot of corn you are buying.
    11. Those are a lot of corns you are buying.

    Is #12 incorrect?
    12. There isn't a lot of people in this server.
    13. There aren't a lot of people in this server.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: A lot of

    1. That is a lot of apple juice you are buying. :D
    2. That is a lot of corn you are buying. :D
    3. That is a lot of corns you are buying.

    Note that, corn is non-count.

    4. That are a lot of corns you are buying. :(
    5. Those are a lot of corns you are buying. :(
    6. That is a lot of dishes you have to wash. :(
    7. That is a lot of dish you have to wash. :(
    8. Those are a lot of dish you have to wash. :(
    9. Those are a lot of dishes you have to wash. :D

    Note that, the subject 'That' is singular, so it takes a singular verb:

    That is a lot of dishes.

    If the subject is plural, then the verb, too, is plural:

    Those are a lot of dishes.

    10. That is a lot of corn you are buying. :D
    11. Those are a lot of corns you are buying. :(

    Note that, 'corn' is non-count and that the structure is a linking structure:

    Those = corn (Count, Plural = Non-count, Plural) Not OK

    'Those' and 'corn' are not compatible, but 'Those' and 'corn cans' are compatible:

    Those are a lot of corn cans.
    Those = cans (Count, Plural = Count, Plural) OK

    12. There isn't a lot of people in this server. :(
    13. There aren't a lot of people in this server. :D

    Note that, 'people' is a Count noun:

    One person; Two people.

    All the best, :D

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Default

    You're welcome. :D

  5. #5
    shane is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: A lot of

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    3. That is a lot of corns you are buying.

    Note that, corn is non-count.

    'My, that is a lot of corns you have on your foot!'

  6. #6
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    Default

    lol

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A lot of

    Quote Originally Posted by shane
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    3. That is a lot of corns you are buying.

    Note that, corn is non-count.

    'My, that is a lot of corns you have on your foot!'
    Context!

    You had to pad it, huh?

    At least let jack know that Count corn/corns refers to a small, tender area of horny-skin on the toe.

    Hey, that's not my wordage. It's Oxfords.

  8. #8
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    Default

    What do these mean?

    There is a lot of killing.
    There are a lot of killings.

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    In the first, the action is being considered as a whole, not individual cases. In the second, the number of individual deaths is being considered.

  10. #10
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    Default

    What do these mean?

    When would I use this?
    1. There is a lot of car over there.

    And when would I use this?
    2. There are a lot of cars over there.

    How do I know which one to use? Does it matter?

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