Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Catenatives


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 17
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Catenatives

    hi,
    i want to know the difference between catenatives and semi-auxilaries modals.

  1. Soup's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,892
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Catenatives

    Try here Appendix:English catenative verbs - Wiktionary

    Note, dare (to) is considered a semi-modal auxiliary verb. Particularly in negative, the modal form is preferred.

    He didn't dare to climb the tree.
    He didn't dare climb the tree.

    Try here also http://www3.telus.net/linguisticsiss...nteaching.html
    ___________________________

    The following is from need (post #2)

    Need as a catenative with gerund:
    "The washing needs doing."
    This has passive meaning.

    Need as a catenative with to-infinitive:
    "You need to do the washing."
    This has active meaning.

    Need with an interrupted catenative:
    "You will need some help to do all that washing."
    This is used when ‘need’ has an object.

    Need as a semi-modal (with bare infinitive and doing what modals all love to do):
    Forming questions by inversion:
    "Need I do the washing right now?"
    (Compare the catenative with do-support:
    "Do I need to do the washing right now?")
    Form negatives by adding not and -n’t:
    "You needn’t do the washing right now."
    (Compare the catenative with do-support:
    "You don’t need to do the washing right now."
    Doesn’t have to inflect for the 3rd person singular:
    "I don’t think she need do it now."
    (Compare the non-modal version:
    "I don’t think she needs to do it now.")

    This semi-modal nature of ‘need’ is most apparent when it is used to form questions and negatives. Otherwise, ‘need’ doesn’t usually become semi-modal as the main verb of a sentence. In the last example above, ‘need’ is the main verb of a relative clause.
    Last edited by Soup; 09-Jun-2008 at 14:24.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Catenatives

    Soup, I'm curious to know how you define a 'modal verb'.

  2. Soup's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,892
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Catenatives

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Soup, I'm curious to know how you define a 'modal verb'.
    It's a meaty topic, Clark. What specifically about modals would you like me to give my opinion on?

    modal verbs - Google Search

    Try here also Modals in English Language Teaching


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Catenatives

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    It's a meaty topic, Clark. What specifically about modals would you like me to give my opinion on?

    modal verbs - Google Search

    Try here also Modals in English Language Teaching
    Thanks for the reference sites.
    I was just curious as to whether you use a formal or a semantic criterion to distinguish between a modal and a non-modal. Sometimes grammarians give a mixture of the two criteria, which leads to cofusion.

  3. Soup's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,892
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Catenatives

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Thanks for the reference sites.
    I was just curious as to whether you use a formal or a semantic criterion to distinguish between a modal and a non-modal. Sometimes grammarians give a mixture of the two criteria, which leads to cofusion.
    No worries. I'm a descriptivist.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •