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  1. #1
    enydia is offline Member
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    Default infinitive clause to talk about a result

    Hi, Teachers.

    I often see sentences like this: he arrived home to find that the house had been burgled.

    Can I say he will arrive home to find that the house will have been burgled.

    Someone told me that the infinitive clauses can only be used to talk a past result that somebody found out or learned at the end of a journey or task, not a future result. Is it true?

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia

  2. #2
    enydia is offline Member
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    Default Re: infinitive clause to talk about a result

    Another question:

    Which of the following setences is correct?

    (1) He will find that the house will have been burgled.
    (2) He will find that the house has been burgled.
    (3) He will find that the house is burgled.

    How to determine the tense of the subordinate clause after the main clause in future tense such as he will find?

    Thanks in advance.

  3. #3
    enydia is offline Member
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    Default Re: infinitive clause to talk about a result

    Hi, Teachers.

    Is there anything wrong or bad in my post?


  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: infinitive clause to talk about a result

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hi, Teachers.

    I often see sentences like this: he arrived home to find that the house had been burgled.

    Can I say he will arrive home to find that the house will have been burgled.

    Someone told me that the infinitive clauses can only be used to talk a past result that somebody found out or learned at the end of a journey or task, not a future result. Is it true?

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia
    You can make a prediction using this format. You can almost hear the narrator of a film. "Poor Peter. He is on his way home. He is thinking about the cold beer in the fridge, and the game that will be on TV tonight. He doesn't know that he will instead arrive home to find that his house has been broken into, his television stolen, and worse, that his beer had been drunk."

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