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  1. #1
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    Arrow Anglika, please look the passage through

    Dear Anglika, and other forum members,

    I found out that you are now online which makes me very happy to get your precious advice on the vocabulary, grammar, style and structure of the English language.
    Please, I would like you all to look through the passage below and comment on it. Any relevant commentaries are kindly accepted. Thank you.


    “The History of Prophets” by Rabghuzi (Qisas ar-Rabghuzi/ Kitab-i Rabghuzi) is reckoned to be one of the most authoritative Turkic works embracing a wide range of stories about prophets. This work, as stated by its first editors and researchers, was markedly different from the Arabic writings (for instance, outstanding work “The History of Prophets and Tsars” at-Tabari) and Persian (an-Nisaburi/Nishapuri) versions of stories about prophets, as well as it absorbed quite significant stratum of Old-turkic folklore. Its earliest edition was carried out by N.Ilminski who obviously had not concentrated on the major scientific edition and most likely counted on the Tatar readers of the Volga region .
    At the end of the 19th century, the scientific description of the work was completed by Ch.Rieu while cataloguing the manuscripts of the British Museum . That year, a well-known Russian orientalist V.Rosen in his review for the catalogue of Rieu, touching upon his description “The History of Rabghuzi”, wrote: “…Even though there is, i.e. at the British Museum – K.I., neither a copy of Kutadghu-Bilig that Vienna proud about, nor manuscripts in the Uygur language at large, it keeps the most ancient copy complied in 710, the History of Prophets by Rabghuzi”.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Anglika, please look the passage through

    Quote Originally Posted by azkad View Post
    Dear Anglika, and other forum members,

    I found out that you are now online which makes me very happy to get your precious advice on the vocabulary, grammar, style and structure of the English language.
    Please, I would like you all to look through the passage below and comment on it. Any relevant commentaries are kindly accepted. Thank you.


    “The History of Prophets” by Rabghuzi (Qisas ar-Rabghuzi/ Kitab-i Rabghuzi) is reckoned to be one of the most authoritative Turkic works embracing a wide range of stories about prophets. This work, as stated by its first editors and researchers, was markedly different from the Arabic writings (for instance, the outstanding work “The History of Prophets and Tsars”, at-Tabari) and Persian (an-Nisaburi/Nishapuri) versions of stories about prophets, because it had absorbed quite a significant stratum of Old-Turkic folklore. The earliest published edition was carried out by N. Ilminski , who obviously had not concentrated on the major scientific studies and most likely counted on the Tatar readers of the Volga region.
    At the end of the 19th century, a scientific description of the work was completed by Ch. Rieu while cataloguing the manuscripts of the British Museum. That year, a well-known Russian orientalist, V. Rosen, in his review of Rieu's catalogue, touching upon his description of “The History of Rabghuzi”, wrote: “…Even though there is, i.e. at the British Museum – K.I., neither a copy of Kutadghu-Bilig that Vienna is proud to have/can be proud of, nor manuscripts in the Uygur language at large, it keeps to the most ancient copy compiled in 710 A.D,, the History of Prophets by Rabghuzi”.

    Thank you.
    .

  3. #3
    azkad's Avatar
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    Arrow Re: Anglika, please look the passage through

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    .
    Thank you very much Anglika, it is indeed very helpful of you to assist me and many others in improving our English.
    Another question has arisen while reading your review. Could you please explain the sentence structure keep to? Isn't possible to to use keep in this case without to? Thanks.
    Last edited by azkad; 14-Jun-2008 at 01:13. Reason: spelling mistake

  4. #4
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: Anglika, please look the passage through

    Quote Originally Posted by azkad View Post
    Thank you very much Anglika, it is indeed very helpful of you to assist me and many others in improving our English.
    Another question has arisen while reading your review. Could you please explain the sentence structure keep to? Isn't possible to to use keep in this case without to? Thanks.
    "keep to" = 1 a: to stay in He kept to his room
    b: to limit oneself to She keeps to a vegetarian diet
    2: to abide by They keep to the text


    It indicates that the editors are following the original text exactly

    However - on reading that section again, I see that it reads that the British Museum keeps [owns] the most ancient copy ..... my apologies for misleading you.

    Also, I am still puzzled about the comment relating to Vienna.

  5. #5
    azkad's Avatar
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    Arrow Re: Anglika, please look the passage through

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "keep to" = 1 a: to stay in He kept to his room
    b: to limit oneself to She keeps to a vegetarian diet
    2: to abide by They keep to the text


    It indicates that the editors are following the original text exactly

    However - on reading that section again, I see that it reads that the British Museum keeps [owns] the most ancient copy ..... my apologies for misleading you.

    Also, I am still puzzled about the comment relating to Vienna.
    Dear Anglika, I can't elucidate this question, since I am only translating the text from Russian into English. It is a scientific work and you must have already felt this. But I will contact the owner of the work and let you know about it very soon. Thank you very very much for your help.

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