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  1. #21
    tzfujimino's Avatar
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Thank you for your reply. Don't really understand. Should the following sentences with "improve" be in active voice?

    #1 Working condition in the factory has improved.
    #2 His health has improved
    #3 Air quality of the city has improved
    #4 His financial condition has improved.

    Is there any other application of "improve" which is in passive voice? If yes, could you please give me an example? Thank you.
    I've just visited British National Corpus.
    I'd like to give you these links just for your reference :

    SARA Search Results
    SARA Search Results
    SARA Search Results

    This is all I can do at the moment...

  2. #22
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Over the past three decades, Chinese villagers’ living standard has been improved noticeably.Steamed buns unaffordable for them in the old days are now on the their daily menu;
    Hi ohmyrichard,

    I think you probably misinterpret my words. The author means a comparison between the old days (around 1970s) and present days. So I think it might be inappropriate to to revise to " Over the past three decades". Here's the URL link about the original text.

    http://bdwm.net/bbs/bbstcon.php?boar...hreadid=239652

    And I really didn't know there are two kinds of steamed buns in China before read your post because I don't eat it much.

    I think corn buns probably are cheaper but buns made of flour are expensive. And in the old days, Chinese peasants could not afford to white steamed buns but steamed corn buns probably were available for them since it is cheaper economically.

    On the base of that, it is not good to omit "white" from "steamed bun" though my translation is not accurate about it. I admit that I translated it literally without consideration.


    Any other comment?
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 14-Jun-2008 at 16:32.

  3. #23
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Incidentally, what do you think of my revision of that translation?

    Over the past three decades, Chinese villagersí living standard has been improved noticeably. Steamed buns unaffordable for them in the old days are now on the their daily menu; electric fans, telephones, TV sets, washing machines, even air conditioners are easily accessible for ordinary rural households; old rundown cottages have been replaced by solid brick houses. However, China pays for all these gains at a dear price. Fresh air, clean water and green mountains, of which rural folks were proud, do not exist any more. The burgeoning economy is developing at the expense of rural resources and ecological environment. The main environmental changes during the past 30 or so years are as follows:
    Soup

  4. #24
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Oh, ohmyrichard,

    Come to think of it, I heard about "wo,wo,tou" - a kind of bun which is usually made of corn or mixture of corn powder and wheat flour. It is said the north people used to eat it, especially people in Liaoling, Helongjiang, Jiling provinces.

    Here's a picture about "wo wo tou". It is yellow steamed bun.
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 05-Sep-2008 at 05:53.

  5. #25
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    I've just visited British National Corpus.
    I'd like to give you these links just for your reference :

    SARA Search Results
    SARA Search Results
    SARA Search Results

    This is all I can do at the moment...
    Dear tzfujimino,

    I am moved by you. So much examples, they are really impressive. You are so kind. Of course, soup and ohmyrichard and others too.

    I think my English will improve soon with the help of all you.

  6. #26
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    [/indent]Soup
    Did you mean that there is still something wrong with the sentences and words which were typed in red? They are not so idiomatic,right? I take your point. Thanks.
    ACtually when I first read the first post in this thread and tried to revise the original version, I did not know you were doing the same job. Otherwise I might not make such an effort, because compared with you native speakers, what we lack is that linguistic intuition. A lot of times we are not sure how to put Chinese things in appropriate English. One big mistake we are very likely to make is literal translation or Chinglish, which makes our writings unreadable sometimes and just keeps native speaker readers guessing.
    I have learned a lot from your revision and ensuing comments.Thank you.

  7. #27
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi ohmyrichard,

    I think you probably misinterpret my words. The author means a comparison between the old days (around 1970s) and present days. So I think it might be inappropriate to to revise to " Over the past three decades". Here's the URL link about the original text.

    http://bdwm.net/bbs/bbstcon.php?boar...hreadid=239652

    And I really didn't know there are two kinds of steamed buns in China before read your post because I don't eat it much.

    I think corn buns probably are cheaper but buns made of flour are expensive. And in the old days, Chinese peasants could not afford to white steamed buns but steamed corn buns probably were available for them since it is cheaper economically.

    On the base of that, it is not good to omit "white" from "steamed bun" though my translation is not accurate about it. I admit that I translated it literally without consideration.


    Any other comment?
    Then why not "compared with (three) decades ago"? Still I do not think "over the past three years" is wrong even after I have read the sentence in the original. I admit that I made a mistake about the idiom "at a price".
    But I do think that "to be faithful to the spirit of the original in Chinese is much more important than being faithful to the form," as suggested by Mr Qi Shouhua, who emigrated to the States and now teaches writing at a university in the Midwest. What we are here doing is called "idiomatic revision." It is a great idea to ask native speakers of English to check it for you. After all, getting our meanings across to our potential readers(our imagined readers should be native speakers) is our top priority. Really Soup's revision is better than mine. Still, sometimes we need to explicitly explain what is peculiar to Chinese culture.
    Thanks for pointing out my mistakes and causing me to think of more.

  8. #28
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Hi Ohmyrichard,

    I didn't mean to point out your mistakes because there are variations of idioms. I am not confident of my English.

    All your comments here are meaningful and helpful though you are not an English native speaker.

    My goal is not to be a translator. I just hope my English writing would be flowing and smooth. But I fail to write any articles by myself so I have to exercise my English on the base of Chinese articles. I know this is not a good method but I don't have a better choice so far.

    Have a good day!
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 15-Jun-2008 at 05:30. Reason: typo

  9. #29
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Hello Soup,

    Would you please give me a hand again? Do you think I should switch my title to "China Countryside Environment"?

    I just learned the difference between "rural area" and "countryside". Please read another thread I started. Here is the URL link.

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...untryside.html

    Thanks in advance.

  10. #30
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    Default re: The Chinese Rural Environment

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    ACtually when I first read the first post in this thread and tried to revise the original version, I did not know you were doing the same job. Otherwise I might not make such an effort, because compared with you native speakers, what we lack is that linguistic intuition.
    Collaboration is important, especially in editing and proof-reading. We learn from each other, right?

    Your contributions are most welcome. Keep up the good work!

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