Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 527
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #11

    Question Re: English Vocabulary Question

    Hello
    I found that question very interesting.
    I checked Cambridge Online Dictionary and thesaurus and I came accross

    Shine : to be extremely good at an activity or skill, in an obvious way

    What do you think about it ?

    Best regards.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 5
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #12

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    Dear Jaskin,
    I am pleased to read that someone found that question of interest. I was beginning to feel the question had offended the sensibilities of this forum's membership based on some of the responses I read.
    "Shine" is interesting but I have always felt it was solely applicable to the achievements of people. It does state in a single word an action that is superior to the norm, but I am not sure it would be applicable to, say, a machine. Maybe it would. I am continuing my search.

    Best wishes,
    Dan


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 43
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #13

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    infallible

    "unfailing in effectiveness or operation; certain: an infallible remedy."

    From Latin "not deceive"

    I think a lot of English speakers use it to mean, "it wont let you down".

    We live in a fear based society so I think most people if offered would choose the infallible option, not the best.

    So maybe infallible is the new best.

    Everyone thinks their product is the best, excellent, amazing, awesome, wonderful. If you tell me your product is infallible, I would believe your product is the best.

    Sometimes best is not always best.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 43
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #14

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    My client feels that any language worth its salt should have more than one word for the act of performing in a superb manner and as a result, English is a very imperfect language.
    Respectfully inform your client that "no language is infallible".


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,425
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #15

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    danielshea:
    Perhaps envy will rouse us to join your quest more assiduously...if you will tell us the tongue of your disillusioned chum, and the magic word he has at his disposal in his own language. Just so we can weigh up what we are competing with.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 43
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #16

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    English word meaning a social situation is performing in a superb manner.

    scintillating.

    If a conversation is working very well. People do get angry but everyone is having fun. Nobody is offended.

    The conversation was scintillating.

    From Latin 'scintillare' send out sparks

    literal use:

    Exposing quartz crystal to gamma radiation causes it to scintillate.
    This can be seen as tiny flashes of light when viewed in a darkened room.

    Often used as a replacement for "performing in a superb manner" in social situations.

    It was a scintillating conversation.

    It was a scintillating stage performance.

    Her speech was scintillating.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 527
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #17

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    Perhaps such a world is kind of admission of limitations of the ways we can act.
    It Seems that you are looking for a quote single word an action that is superior to the norm.
    The norm are changing, is there any use hammering such a word ?
    Nirvana is a word that express a state of perfection, but it is a noun.
    By the way I hope it will be a scintillating conversation.


    ( I expressed myself in the best way I could )
    Last edited by Jaskin; 23-Jun-2008 at 01:35.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 10
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #18

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    Quote Originally Posted by danielshea View Post
    Many thanks for the suggestions. I do, however, have a question about the verbs using the prefix "out-." Is it not possible to "out- perform, match, class, etc." all those in your field and still not function at a level deemed beyond expectations? It seems to me that the "out-" verbs are more comparative and do not address the true level of achievement, just the achievement level attained against competitors. In some degree, the same could be said for "transcend" as well although it could also stand alone without a comparative consideration.. "Stellar," which is an adjective and not a verb, means 'star-like" and does provide a definition that works when using an adjective. I was seeking verbs, however. Other than "excel" and "transcend," is that it? I am not sure, and am going to continue searching other sources in the meantime.
    Thanks again,
    Dan
    May be I did not get a connotation of the question but
    I would say, it is more philosophical point of view. You do like the word "excel", but Etymology: from Latin excellere to rise up.
    You can not rise up from nothing, only in comparison you can do this, otherwise how you know that you rise up. The easiest way to give a sentence with a gap and we shall try to fill in with the best word we can.
    Or you just say:" Go there, but I don't where. Bring me somewhat, but I don't know what.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 10
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #19

    Re: English Vocabulary Question

    Just one example. Boss orders something to do. But remember, this is his subordinate obligation to do this order.
    What is the best adverb in the answer to fill in the gap, to stress that he/she knows that it is her/his obligation and he/she defenitly will do this.
    Boss:" Print this letter right now, please"
    Subordinate:" Yes, I'll do this (...obligatory-adverb...)
    P.S. Definitly, surely and certainly do not stress obligation.
    Strong-strongly
    Obligatiry-?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. some question about english
    By farooq in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 19-Feb-2007, 17:11
  2. English vocabulary lists with French equivalents???
    By Catherine C. in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-May-2006, 13:47
  3. Vocabulary of Australian English
    By peppy_man in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-May-2005, 14:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •