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Thread: Cha-> Gotcha

  1. #1
    thedaffodils's Avatar
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    Default Cha-> Gotcha

    I knew "cha" means "you". But why do Americans pronounce "you" in this way?

    Thank cha? No, Thank you!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    I knew "cha" means "you". But why do Americans pronounce "you" in this way?

    Thank cha? No, Thank you!

    Got you

    Got yer

    Got'ya

    Gotcha.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Got you

    Got yer

    Got'ya

    Gotcha.
    I got you! I got cha?

    Thank you for your help again!

  4. #4
    seba_870701 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    I knew "cha" means "you". But why do Americans pronounce "you" in this way?

    Thank cha? No, Thank you!
    Hi Daffodil
    The answer provided by Bhaisahab is OK but it's very laconic.
    In connected speech 'you' can change in 'cha' only if it follows a word ending with 't.' This is called coalescent assimilation.
    I guess the following two are the most common examples:
    got you --> gotcha
    want you --> wantcha.
    But it is posible whenever a man speaks fast, e.g.:
    beat you --> beatcha,
    meet you --> meetcha,
    etc.

    I hope it helps you a little more.

    Seba

    PS
    That kind of assimilation takes place in spokn English only and it is considered ungrammatical to put it in writing.
    Last edited by seba_870701; 15-Jun-2008 at 11:35. Reason: Post Scriptum added

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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    Here's another example:

    jawanna = do you want to

    ja < d'ya < do you
    wanna < want to

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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    Seba & Soup,

    Thank you for your answers. You are helpful.

  7. #7
    seba_870701 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    At your service
    S~

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    mfwills is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    Quote Originally Posted by seba_870701 View Post
    That kind of assimilation takes place in spokn English only and it is considered ungrammatical to put it in writing.
    Formally, no. Informally, no problem.

    Consider also the possibility that you're writing dialect for whatever purpose, in which you might want the person speaking in that fashion to establish personality, locale, etc.

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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    cha can be used to replace you but not in normal settings....it's used more for informal conversations...

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Cha-> Gotcha

    The assimilation can go further:

    Mind what you are doing => Mind whatcha doing

    But also

    What are you doing? => Whatcha doing?
    and
    What do you think? => Whatcha fink?

    So "whatcha" can stand for both "what you are" and "what are/do you?" In the case of "What do you," there may be a bit of voicing - I've heard both /ʧ/ and /ʤ/.

    I suspect that this accounts for the (Br E only?) informal greeting often spelt "wotcher!"



    b
    Last edited by BobK; 24-Jun-2008 at 12:28. Reason: Add bit about voicing

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