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Thread: linguistic

  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    linguistic

    i'd like to know the difference between grammar and linguistic...please i need these answer

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    #2

    Re: linguistic

    Hi there,

    Why not take a look at our definition of Grammar - http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/grammar.html

    Linguistics:

    (from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)
    linguistics noun [U] (ALSO linguistic science)
    the systematic study of the structure and development of language in general or of particular languages

    Hope that helps.
    I'm not a teacher, so please consider any advice I give in that context.

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    #3
    I'd say that grammar is a part of linguistics, which is the umbrella term for the study of language.


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    #4

    Re: linguistic

    Liguistics is the systematic study of the structure and development of language in general or of particular languages but grammar is the rules about how words change their form and combine with other words to make sentences

  2. Frank Antonson's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: linguistic

    At least here in the USA confusion arises over what I separate (and so do House and Harman) into "morphology" the way words change and effect each other, and "syntax" (the way sentences are put together). It is because of this that I hate to hear someone refer to the "simple predicate" of a sentence as the "verb" of the sentence. "Grammar" I use to cover both studies, and, of course "linguistics", the science of language, is way broader, including semantics, phonetics, writing systems, usage, dialect geography, etc.

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