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  1. #11
    2006 is offline Banned
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    Re: I've been living vs I've lived

    hi riverkid

    Thanks for your comments, but I am not sure which specific "errant ideas" you are referring to.

  2. #12
    riverkid is offline Banned
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    Re: I've been living vs I've lived

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    hi riverkid

    Thanks for your comments, but I am not sure which specific "errant ideas" you are referring to.
    You're welcome, 2006 and a belated thank you for yours.

    What I meant by errant ideas are these things that are often repeated that simply aren't true. In another thread, Ouisch mentioned that American school systems have used of Warriner's. [sp??] I believe that this particular grammar saw widespread use though I may well be mistaken.

    Anywoo, in another discussion, on another site, some years ago, someone posted from this grammar, the notion that the present perfect was used for actions that continued into the future.

    We know that this is not the case. Perhaps, if Ouisch still has her old school books, she could look this up and post what was stated there.

  3. #13
    sara88 is offline Member
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    Re: I've been living vs I've lived

    simply I'm confused again.
    "Present perfect can be used for unfinished events or states in the past, which continue to the present.
    ex: Patty has smoked since 1980.(patty still smokes).
    -He has been sick for a month.(unfinished action)". From my advanced grammar book.
    Now come back againto my early example:
    I've lived in this old house for six years.( according to the above quote this must be an unfinished action). right!!!


    Now let me quote Riverkid on that:
    "Husband: [looking at the house] I've lived in this house.

    Wife: Really Dear, when was that? "

    I think you must use past perfect unstead, because it's a finished action. You should say:
    I had lived in this house or I had been living in this house.
    Kindly correct my mistakes.

  4. #14
    rj1948 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: I've been living vs I've lived

    Quote Originally Posted by sara88 View Post
    simply I'm confused again.
    "Present perfect can be used for unfinished events or states in the past, which continue to the present.
    ex: Patty has smoked since 1980.(patty still smokes).
    -He has been sick for a month.(unfinished action)". From my advanced grammar book.
    Now come back againto my early example:
    I've lived in this old house for six years.( according to the above quote this must be an unfinished action). right!!!


    Now let me quote Riverkid on that:
    "Husband: [looking at the house] I've lived in this house.

    Wife: Really Dear, when was that? "
    I think you must use past perfect unstead, because it's a finished action. You should say:
    I had lived in this house or I had been living in this house.
    Kindly correct my mistakes.
    If Patty still smokes,use-Patty has been smoking since 1980.
    The strees is continuity.
    He has been sick for months.
    The stress in=s on 'sick'
    SEE:BBC World Service | Learning English | Learn it

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/le...arnitv67.shtml
    Regards,
    rj1948.
    Last edited by rj1948; 19-Jun-2008 at 09:04.

  5. #15
    sara88 is offline Member
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    Re: I've been living vs I've lived

    Thanks a lot rj for your comment and for the links. I've been using bbc learning materials lately but I didn't check the grammar section. It's quite interesting.
    You said:
    "If Patty still smokes,use-Patty has been smoking since 1980". that's right but I quoted that from my grammar book.
    i think that I come to the conclusion, after reading your responses and the last two links, that if we use in one sentence the present perfect+ since or for= we mean by that that the action is not finished yet. This is one of the uses of the present perfect, of course there are other uses as well.

  6. #16
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    Re: "I've been living" vs "I've lived"

    wow, so much of the above advice is misleading if not wholly wrong.

    the present perfect does not at all suggest that an action is finished

    How long have you lived here? I've lived here for 6 years.

    does that suggest the guy is moving house? No.


    the use of the continuous . . . I've been living here . . only emphasizes the continuity of the action.

    It means the same as I've lived here . . but with added emphasis on the fact that it's been a continuous process

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    Re: "I've been living" vs "I've lived"


  8. #18
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Re: "I've been living" vs "I've lived"

    Quote Originally Posted by the concierge View Post
    The present perfect does not at all suggest that an action is finished.
    Absolutely correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by the concierge View Post
    How long have you lived here?
    Quote Originally Posted by the concierge View Post
    I've lived here for 6 years.

    Does that suggest the guy is moving house? No.



    Quote Originally Posted by the concierge View Post
    The use of the continuous . . . I've been living here . . only emphasizes the continuity of the action.

    It means the same as I've lived here . . but with added emphasis on the fact that it's been a continuous process

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