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  1. #1
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default intensive = stative?

    Dear teachers,

    1) Is intensive verb the same as a stative verb?

    2) Are the following verbs intensive / stative verbs?
    a) appall(ed)
    b) surpris(ed)
    c) disappoint(ed)

    Many thanks,
    Hela

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    1) No; an intensive verb emphasises or intenisifes something. A stative verb could be intensive- loathe, etc, but they aren't the same.

  3. #3
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Dear teachers,

    What's the difference then between a stative and an intensive verb?

    Don't they both describe:

    a) a state: be, look, seem, appear, sound, smell, taste, feel, consider;
    (love, like, dislike, loathe... ?)
    b) a change: become, get or grow, turn;
    c) an attitude: stay, remain, stand, keep ?

    And what about the following verbs, are they intensive / stative verbs?
    a) appall(ed)
    b) surpris(ed)
    c) disappoint(ed)

    Thanks a lot,
    Hela

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Dear teachers,

    What's the difference then between a stative and an intensive verb?
    Well, the term "intensive" has a few meanings:

    (1) Semantics

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Harrison
    The intensive, moderative, and attenuative aspects indicate the intensity of a situation. For example, when a liquid is moving in the moderative aspect, we use the verb "flow," in the attenuative we say "trickle," and in the intensive we use words like "gush" and "flood." Similarly, when something emits light in the attenuative aspect we use verbs such as "glimmer" or "glow," in the moderative we say "shine," and in the intensive we say "glare."
    [url=http://www.rick.harrison.net/langlab/aspect.html]Source[/url
    According to Harrison, verbs are intensive if they express a vigorous event.

    (2) Verb Complementation

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Santana
    Intensive verbs
    Stative: be, seen, look, appear, remai, keep, stay, feel, sound, smell, taste, make, amount to, make up
    Dynamic: become, turn (into), go, get, fall, come, end up, grow, prove

    Source
    According to Santana, as verb complements both stative and dynamic verbs alike are intensive.

    (3) Logic: Suppositions versus Conditionals
    The term "intensive" applies to concessive clauses. The sources are somewhat heavy, though, and require a background in logic. If you're interested, try an online search using concessive clauses.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hela
    And what about the following verbs, are they intensive / stative verbs?
    a) appall(ed)
    b) surpris(ed)
    c) disappoint(ed)
    appall(ed)
    surpris(ed)
    disappoint(ed)

    All the best, :D

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