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  1. #1
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    Default "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Hi,

    Please tell me why people use "economic situation" but not "economy situation". Personally, I think "economic situation" is something connected with the trade, industry and development of wealth of a country, an area or a society while "economy situation" means "the situation of the economy". Therefore, the latter must be better, but why isn't it used?

    And the most important question is: when do we use a compound noun and when do we use an adjective + a noun?
    i.e:
    volunteer work
    voluntary work

    I'm so dumb now

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Hi, could anybody answer this question, please?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Hic, why doesn't anybody give me an idea? :(:(

  4. #4
    colloquium is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    It's a "situation" and the adjective "economic" describes the nature of the situation. I think you are perhaps over complicating the issue in your mind.


    Volunteer work = work which is done by volunteers.

    Voluntary work
    = work which is done voluntarily.

    When the words are used together, they amount to the same thing.

    "I'm doing some volunteer/voluntary work."

    "Volunteer/voluntary work is very rewarding."


    How often do you find noun+noun compound combinations which have an adjective+noun equivilant? Do you have any other examples?

    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    Clark is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Quote Originally Posted by newbie View Post
    Hi,

    Please tell me why people use "economic situation" but not "economy situation". Personally, I think "economic situation" is something connected with the trade, industry and development of wealth of a country, an area or a society while "economy situation" means "the situation of the economy". Therefore, the latter must be better, but why isn't it used?
    (
    'Economy' as an adjective means 'cheap' (e.g. economy class). So 'economy situation' is a meaningless word-combination.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Thanks a lot, Clark and Colloquium,
    but I think I'm still confused about this matter. Please have a look at theses:

    "history teacher" vs "historical teacher"
    "maths book" vs "mathematical book"
    "finance crisis" vs "financial crisis"
    "government plan" vs "governmental plan"
    etc.

    Many thanks
    N.

  7. #7
    colloquium is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Quote Originally Posted by newbie View Post
    Thanks a lot, Clark and Colloquium,
    but I think I'm still confused about this matter. Please have a look at theses:

    "history teacher" vs "historical teacher" The teacher is not "historical" (a quality or feature) - he teaches "history" (a subject).
    "maths book" vs "mathematical book" It's not the book itself, but the ideas inside which are "mathmatical". It is a book based on maths, a "maths book" (or "math" in the U.S).
    "finance crisis" vs "financial crisis"
    "government plan" vs "governmental plan"
    etc.

    Many thanks
    N.
    I'm not sure about the last 2.

  8. #8
    Clark is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: "compound noun" vs "noun+ adjective"

    Quote Originally Posted by newbie View Post
    Thanks a lot, Clark and Colloquium,
    but I think I'm still confused about this matter. Please have a look at theses:

    "history teacher" vs "historical teacher"
    "maths book" vs "mathematical book"
    "finance crisis" vs "financial crisis"
    "government plan" vs "governmental plan"
    etc.

    Many thanks
    N.
    1. Why 'history teacher', and not 'historical teacher'?
    History lesson, history museum, history textbook, etc. - in all of these collocations 'history' is understood as a science, and not just as something that happened in the past or connected with the past.

    2. The same explanation holds good for 'math(s)'.

    3. Finance committee, but financial centre.
    Finance director, but financial advisor.

    I think a noun that combines with 'finance' means the one who gives money, a noun that combines with 'financial' means connected in this way or another with finance. That's why 'financial crisis', and not 'finance crisis'.

    4. Government vs. governmental
    As for these two words I have no clear idea how to distinguish between them.

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