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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Question about sentences in my textbook

    I feel puzzled about the following sentences in my English textbooks.
    Are they correct or not?

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise for(of?) you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It is the only man-made structure which(that?) can be seen from space.

    However, after paying it into my account, my consious(?) began to trouble me. Should I...?

  2. #2
    Natalie27 Guest

    Default Re: Question about sentences in my textbook

    Quote Originally Posted by davidcc
    I feel puzzled about the following sentences in my English textbooks.
    Are they correct or not?

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise for(of?) you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It is the only man-made structure which(that?) can be seen from space.

    However, after paying it into my account, my consious(?) began to trouble me. Should I...?



    These would be my choices:

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise OF you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It could be both but there is a slight difference in meaning. If you say that the prison is slowly filling up with water, it means that Phantom does not necessarily have to be the one doing it himself.
    But if you say that the prison is being filled with water, I might think that Phantom has put a hose to it and turned the tap on purposely. :wink:

    I am not sure about your last sentence. Sorry. Can you rephrase the meaning, please. I am a little lost

  3. #3
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    These would be my choices:

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise OF you to shampoo your hair frequently.
    Could you elaborate on that?

    FRC

  4. #4
    Natalie27 Guest

    Default Re: Question about sentences in my textbook

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie27
    Quote Originally Posted by davidcc
    I feel puzzled about the following sentences in my English textbooks.
    Are they correct or not?

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise for(of?) you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It is the only man-made structure which(that?) can be seen from space.

    However, after paying it into my account, my consious(?) began to trouble me. Should I...?



    These would be my choices:

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise OF you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It could be both but there is a slight difference in meaning. If you say that the prison is slowly filling up with water, it means that Phantom does not necessarily have to be the one doing it himself.
    But if you say that the prison is being filled with water, I might think that Phantom has put a hose to it and turned the tap on purposely. :wink:

    I am not sure about your last sentence. Sorry. Can you rephrase the meaning, please. I am a little lost

    "smart of you"...clever, witty OF you to do something.
    in this example "it's smart of you to wash your hair" means it's plain common sense that you want to wash your hair, it's the right thing to do, go ahead and wash your hair.
    but if you say "it's smart for you to wash your hair", there is another little message attached to it, meaning there are definitely reasons for you to wash your hair", there is more reasoning behind that statement....the pollution will possibly cause some abnormalities to your hair or skin or whatever. I feel it's a bit far fetched and therefore I'm going with "smart of you".

  5. #5
    davidcc Guest

    Default Re: Question about sentences in my textbook

    Hello, Natalie27
    Thank you for your answers.
    The last sentence "However, after paying it into my account, my conscious(?) began to trouble me. " wanted to means that "I began to feel gulity after I paid it into my account", the subject of "paying it into my account" should be "I", not "my conscious", I think.
    Do you have any idea?

    BTW, what about the sentence "It is the only man-made structure which(that?) can be seen from space."? My teacher told me that when sth. is modified by "the only", I should use "that" rather than "which". Then this sentence is wrong. Am I right?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat27
    "smart of you"...clever, witty OF you to do something.
    in this example "it's smart of you to wash your hair" means it's plain common sense that you want to wash your hair, it's the right thing to do, go ahead and wash your hair.
    but if you say "it's smart for you to wash your hair", there is another little message attached to it, meaning there are definitely reasons for you to wash your hair", there is more reasoning behind that statement....the pollution will possibly cause some abnormalities to your hair or skin or whatever. I feel it's a bit far fetched and therefore I'm going with "smart of you".
    Thanks.
    Here some examples from the net:

    But please don't take offense to my comments Richard. In fact, I think it's very amusing and clever for you to be pushing your book on memetics and asserting that pop culture/television shows are much like a malignant mental "Virus", while using one of the most generic and popular shows as your medium.
    "I'm rather impressed that you have already learned that trick," she commented in Sully's deep voice. "It was also very clever for you to try and hide that fact from me; it took a couple of changes before I noticed that your eye color was wrong for you.
    It was very clever of you to notice the connection between
    construction of regular polygons and construction of angles.
    I thought it was clever of you to make the mother cut the wolf’s belly open and slowly take out her children and sew the wolf’s belly back up.
    Are these example correct? Can "clever of you" be replaced with "clever for you" in some of them, or vice-versa?

    Here's another one:

    It is clever and clever of you to
    place it in the post-Hegelian, post-Alphabet, end of your literary history.
    So "it's clever" and "it's clever of you" are two different things?

    FRC

  7. #7
    Natalie27 Guest

    Default Re: Question about sentences in my textbook

    Quote Originally Posted by davidcc
    I feel puzzled about the following sentences in my English textbooks.
    Are they correct or not?

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise for(of?) you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It is the only man-made structure which(that?) can be seen from space.

    However, after paying it into my account, my consious(?) began to trouble me. Should I...?
    As for the structure, I would also go with "that" even though it's OK to use "which" and I it would be still grammatically sound. Why don't we have Cas say something about that? She makes so much sense with all this stuff. Personally, I would use "that"

    the other sentence:
    However, the minute I deposited my money into the account, I began to feel guilty about doing it.

    conscience has to do more with moral issues rather than money.

    cheers

  8. #8
    Natalie27 Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Francois
    Quote Originally Posted by Nat27
    "smart of you"...clever, witty OF you to do something.
    in this example "it's smart of you to wash your hair" means it's plain common sense that you want to wash your hair, it's the right thing to do, go ahead and wash your hair.
    but if you say "it's smart for you to wash your hair", there is another little message attached to it, meaning there are definitely reasons for you to wash your hair", there is more reasoning behind that statement....the pollution will possibly cause some abnormalities to your hair or skin or whatever. I feel it's a bit far fetched and therefore I'm going with "smart of you".
    Thanks.
    Here some examples from the net:

    But please don't take offense to my comments Richard. In fact, I think it's very amusing and clever for you to be pushing your book on memetics and asserting that pop culture/television shows are much like a malignant mental "Virus", while using one of the most generic and popular shows as your medium.
    "I'm rather impressed that you have already learned that trick," she commented in Sully's deep voice. "It was also very clever for you to try and hide that fact from me; it took a couple of changes before I noticed that your eye color was wrong for you.
    It was very clever of you to notice the connection between
    construction of regular polygons and construction of angles.
    I thought it was clever of you to make the mother cut the wolf’s belly open and slowly take out her children and sew the wolf’s belly back up.
    Are these example correct? Can "clever of you" be replaced with "clever for you" in some of them, or vice-versa?

    Here's another one:

    It is clever and clever of you to
    place it in the post-Hegelian, post-Alphabet, end of your literary history.
    So "it's clever" and "it's clever of you" are two different things?

    FRC
    Firstly, I don't think I would go with "clever FOR you". Just doesn't do it for me.
    "clever" and "clever of you" ...the only obvious difference being that the first one refers to anyobody, more like it's a "clever idea/thing altogether to do something" as opposed to "you" having a clever idea about something.

    I would personally use "clever of" but I go purely by context and how it sounds to me. I think this thread was discussed at length somewhere else. I am not trying to pass the buck but Cassie is the expert on those things.

  9. #9
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    OK, thank you

    FRC

  10. #10
    davidcc Guest

    Default Re: Question about sentences in my textbook

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie27
    Quote Originally Posted by davidcc
    I feel puzzled about the following sentences in my English textbooks.
    Are they correct or not?

    City air is dirty and polluted, so it would be wise for(of?) you to shampoo your hair frequently.

    But the Phantom captured him and kept him in a prison, which was slowly
    filling(being filled?) with water.

    It is the only man-made structure which(that?) can be seen from space.

    However, after paying it into my account, my consious(?) began to trouble me. Should I...?
    As for the structure, I would also go with "that" even though it's OK to use "which" and I it would be still grammatical sound. Why don't we Cas say something about that? She makes so much sense with all this stuff. Personally, I would use "that"

    the other sentence:
    However, the minute I deposited my money into the account, I began to feel guilty about doing it.

    consciousness has to do more with moral issues rather than money.

    cheers
    Thank you! :)

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