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  1. #1
    jctgf is offline Key Member
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    Default "out of the reach"

    "I can't afford travelling to Europe this year."

    "Travelling to Europe this year is out of my reach."

    Please, do these sentences convey the same meaning? Is the second one good and natural English?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Default Re: "out of the reach"

    They convey the same meaning of not being able to travel to Europe, but the second could indicate more than lack of money. Context would tell you exactly. Grammatically it is fine.

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