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  1. #1
    bosun is offline Senior Member
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    Smile the comparative form

    Are the follwoing sentences correct? Comparative forms are always confusing!!

    The longer you procrastinate to do your assignments, the greater the chances of your failing the class becomes.

    The moe you neglect your study( or studying??) , the lower the chances of your getting a high grade becomes.

  2. #2
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    Re: the comparative form

    The longer you procrastinate in doing your assignments, the greater the chances of your failing the class.
    or
    The longer you procrastinate in doing your assignments, the greater your chances of failing the class.

    The more you neglect your studies , the poorer the chances of your getting a high grade.
    or
    The more you neglect your studies , the poorer your chances of getting a high grade

  3. #3
    bosun is offline Senior Member
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    Re: the comparative form

    can't I add the verb' become' after

    ... the poorer the chances of your getting a high grade becomes.( or gets)

  4. #4
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    Re: the comparative form

    (Try to avoid using 'get' and 'got' if a more descriptive verb is available.)

    You would add 'become' if - and I know you hate comparatives! - you are emphasizing the increasing chance of failing with the increasing time with your procrastinate.
    So -
    "The teacher has already given you a warning to have your work in on time. She'll only take so many excuses. The longer you procrastinate in doing your assignments, the greater the chances of your failing the class become."
    That is, rather than a direct relationship between how long he procrastinates, and failing, there is the attenuating(=reducing the effect of) factor that an excuse for your procrastination might work with the teacher and you'll still pass. But the more procrastination ( and so excuses that have to be made), the more the teacher will be suspicious, then impatient and unbelieving, and so then say, enough is enough -fail.
    The longer you procrastinate and have to make excuses the teacher will believe, the greater the chances your luck will run out and your chances of failing become.
    HOWEVER: This is a nuance of meaning. Whether you include 'become' or not, most people won't notice! Such is how language is now used - as long as the person gets (used purposely to show my disdain for this sentiment!), how it's expressed 'don't matter'.
    Last edited by David L.; 29-Jun-2008 at 06:17.

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