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  1. #1
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    Default Bored by, with or from?

    Are there correct and incorrect words to use with the verb bore? I believe that saying one is "bored of" something sounds wrong. Take writing as an example. I might be:

    bored by writing
    (meaning writing always bores me)
    bored with writing
    (meaning that at this moment I am tired of it but might return to the activity)

    but I don't think I can be
    bored from writing

    and worst of all I cannot be
    bored of writing

    In summary I think the most acceptable forms are:

    I am tired of something OR
    I am bored with or by something.

    Could a teacher please comment on this? Is it just me who is becoming irritated by children who say they are bored of this and that?

    Finally, if saying "bored of" is not correct is there an easy way of explaining why this is so?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bored by, with or from?

    Bored with is the usual collocation in common-core English, but bored of is an option (Peters 2004, 76) of which CIC British texts have 3.1 iptmw and American texts 0.7.

    Source: British or American English: A Handbook of Word and Grammar Patterns.
    See also, bored of, Language Log: Bored of, and
    General Writing and Grammar Help: "bored of" or "bored with", teenage son, question mark

    ________________________
    The usual preposition to use after the adjective bored is with, as in I got bored with all their squabbling. However, nowadays you increasingly hear — and see — the preposition of being used, especially in informal contexts. (One possible reason for this is the influence of tired of, which has a similar meaning to bored with.) However it’s still best not to use‘bored of ’ in careful speech or writing.

    Source: Good Housekeeping :: Spelling and grammar

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bored by, with or from?

    Thanks Soup

    I have all the answers I need now. All links you provided were highly informative. As language develops it seems traditionalists will just have to grin and bear it. Or bare it. Whatever. Like.

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