There are some nouns that you can count, like tables, chairs, people, bottles, and plants. These are called count nouns. There are some nouns you canít count, like love, liberty, flour, water, whiskey, sand, pain, and milk. When we talk about the count nouns we use MANY and when we talk about the noncount nouns we use MUCH. I remember it this way: If you can count it, you would use the word that you can split into two syllables and count:- MANY. If you canít count it, then you would use the word that you canít split into two syllables:- MUCH.
So an English speaker would NOT say ďAre there many whiskey in Singapore?Ē but we would say ďIs there much whiskey in Singapore?Ē On the other hand, we would also say ďAre there many bottles of whiskey in Singapore?Ē because we can count the bottles but not the whiskey.
Another thing to remember is that we only use MUCH for questions and negative statements.
Here in America we also use the phrase A LOT OF. This can be used for either count or noncount nouns. We always use A LOT OF for positive statements. For negative statements and questions we use either A LOT OF or MUCH. In a question, though, using the word MUCH conveys more of a sense of urgency or concern while A LOT OF gives the impression that itís just a simple question.
He has a lot of whiskey in his house. He has much whiskey in his house.
He doesnít have a lot of / much whiskey in his house.
Does he have a lot of / much whiskey in his house?
I feel a lot of pain in my leg.
I donít feel a lot of / much pain in my leg.
Do you feel a lot of / much pain in your leg?
I need a lot of flour for this bread.
I donít need a lot of / much flour for this bread.
Do I need a lot of / much flour for this bread?
They have a lot of liberty in that country.
They donít have a lot of / much liberty in that country.
Do they have a lot of / much liberty in that country.
She has a lot of love fore her family.
She doesnít have a lot of / much love fro her family.
Does she have a lot of / much love for her family?